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Open AccessArticle

Looking for Black Religions in 20th Century Comics, 1931–1993

Department of Religion, Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA 19081, USA
Religions 2019, 10(6), 400; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10060400
Received: 10 April 2019 / Revised: 30 May 2019 / Accepted: 12 June 2019 / Published: 25 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religions in African American Popular Culture)
Relationships between religion and comics are generally unexplored in the academic literature. This article provides a brief history of Black religions in comic books, cartoons, animation, and newspaper strips, looking at African American Christianity, Islam, Africana (African diaspora) religions, and folk traditions such as Hoodoo and Conjure in the 20th century. Even though the treatment of Black religions in the comics was informed by stereotypical depictions of race and religion in United States (US) popular culture, African American comics creators contested these by offering alternatives in their treatment of Black religion themes. View Full-Text
Keywords: comics; black religions; Voodoo; Black Panther; race and religion; African American religions comics; black religions; Voodoo; Black Panther; race and religion; African American religions
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Chireau, Y. Looking for Black Religions in 20th Century Comics, 1931–1993. Religions 2019, 10, 400.

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