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Open AccessArticle

The Politics of Christian Love: Shaping Everyday Social Interaction and Political Sensibilities among Coptic Egyptians

Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Religions 2019, 10(2), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10020105
Received: 20 December 2018 / Revised: 1 February 2019 / Accepted: 7 February 2019 / Published: 12 February 2019
Christian love has historically been subject of extensive theological study but has rarely been studied within anthropology. Contemporary Coptic society receives growing attention over the last two decades as a minority in Egyptian Muslim majority society. An important bulk of this scholarship involves a discussion of the community’s sometimes self-defined and sometimes ascribed characterization as a persecuted minority. Particular attention has gone to how social and political dimensions of minority life lead to changes in Christian theological understandings. This paper builds on these insights and examines how Christian love is experienced, and shapes feelings of belonging, everyday morality and political sensibilities vis-à-vis Muslim majority society. It draws from ethnographic observations and meetings with Copts living in Egypt between 2014–2017. It focuses on three personal narratives that reveal the complex ways in which a theology of love affects social and political stances. An anthropological focus reveals the fluid boundaries between secular and religious expressions of Christian love. Love for God and for humans are seen as partaking in one divine love. Practicing this love, however, shapes very different responses and can lead to what has been described as Coptic ‘passive victim behaviour’, but also to political activity against the status-quo. View Full-Text
Keywords: Coptic Christians; anthropology of religion; Christian theology; Egypt; minorities; discrimination Coptic Christians; anthropology of religion; Christian theology; Egypt; minorities; discrimination
MDPI and ACS Style

Van Raemdonck, A. The Politics of Christian Love: Shaping Everyday Social Interaction and Political Sensibilities among Coptic Egyptians. Religions 2019, 10, 105.

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