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Muhammad at the Museum: Or, Why the Prophet Is Not Present

Department of Literature, History of Ideas, and Religion, University of Gothenburg, SE405 30 Göteborg, Sweden
Religions 2019, 10(12), 665; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10120665
Received: 30 October 2019 / Revised: 4 December 2019 / Accepted: 5 December 2019 / Published: 10 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion in Museums)
This article analyses museum responses to the contemporary tensions and violence in response to images of Muhammad, from The Satanic Verses to Charlie Hebdo. How does this socio-political frame effect the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NY, the V&A and British Museum in London, and the Louvre in Paris? Different genres of museums and histories of collections in part explain differences in approaches to representations of Muhammad. The theological groundings for a possible ban on prophetic depictions is charted, as well as the widespread Islamic practices of making visual representations of the Prophet. It is argued that museological framings of the religiosity of Muslims become skewed when the veneration of the Prophet is not represented. View Full-Text
Keywords: museums; Islam; Muhammad; Islamicate cultural heritage; images; exhibitions; Islamic art; collection management museums; Islam; Muhammad; Islamicate cultural heritage; images; exhibitions; Islamic art; collection management
MDPI and ACS Style

Grinell, K. Muhammad at the Museum: Or, Why the Prophet Is Not Present. Religions 2019, 10, 665.

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