Next Article in Journal
Daoism and the Project of an Ecological Civilization or Shengtai Wenming 生态文明
Previous Article in Journal
The Samaritans during the Hasmonean Period: The Affirmation of a Discrete Identity?
Previous Article in Special Issue
“Beautiful and New”: The Logic of Complementarity in Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Open AccessArticle

Bewitching Power: The Virtuosity of Gender in Dekker and Massinger’s The Virgin Martyr

Department of Theatre and Performance Studies, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA 30144, USA
Religions 2019, 10(11), 629; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10110629
Received: 16 September 2019 / Revised: 5 November 2019 / Accepted: 12 November 2019 / Published: 14 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion and Theatrical Drama)
This paper examines the reversals of gender in Thomas Dekker and Philip Massinger’s play The Virgin Martyr (1622) in light of early modern scientific notions of the female body. Like well-known female martyrs from the period, such as Anne Askew, the protagonist, Dorothea, takes on characteristically male attributes: she assumes the role of the soldier and defies scientific understanding of the female gender by sealing her phlegmatic “leaky” body and exuding divine heat that defies her cold, wet “nature”. These gender reversals, from Dorothea and other characters, illustrate how the act of martyrdom could be interpreted not only as a miraculous performance, a “witness” to the divine, but one built on sensational, seemingly impossible performances of gender. View Full-Text
Keywords: martyrdom; gender; drama; early modern; Jacobean; masculinity; virgin martyrdom; gender; drama; early modern; Jacobean; masculinity; virgin
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Fish, T. Bewitching Power: The Virtuosity of Gender in Dekker and Massinger’s The Virgin Martyr. Religions 2019, 10, 629.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop