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Open AccessArticle

Assessing Muslim Higher Education and Training Institutions (METIs) and Islamic Studies Provision in Universities in Britain: An Analysis of Training Provision for Muslim Religious Leadership after 9/11

Department of Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
Religions 2019, 10(11), 623; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10110623 (registering DOI)
Received: 22 October 2019 / Revised: 4 November 2019 / Accepted: 6 November 2019 / Published: 11 November 2019
The training of Imams and Muslim religious leaders has received much interest in the post-9/11 era, resulting in a vast amount of research and publications on the topic. The present work explores this literature with the aim of analysing key debates found therein. It finds that throughout the literature there is a pervasive demand for reform of the training and education provided by Muslim higher education and training institutions (METIs) and Islamic studies programmes at universities in the shape of a synthesis of the two pedagogic models. Such demands are founded on the claim that each is lacking in the appositeness of its provision apropos of the British Muslim population. This article calls for an alternative approach to the issue, namely, that the university and the METI each be accorded independence and freedom in its pedagogic ethos and practice (or else risk losing its identity), and a combined education from both instead be promoted as a holistic training model for Muslim religious leadership. View Full-Text
Keywords: Imam training; Muslim religious leadership; Islamic education; darul-ulums; Islamic studies; British Islam Imam training; Muslim religious leadership; Islamic education; darul-ulums; Islamic studies; British Islam
MDPI and ACS Style

Shah, J. Assessing Muslim Higher Education and Training Institutions (METIs) and Islamic Studies Provision in Universities in Britain: An Analysis of Training Provision for Muslim Religious Leadership after 9/11. Religions 2019, 10, 623.

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