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Open AccessArticle

A Preliminary Controlled Vocabulary for the Description of Hagiographic Texts

Department of History, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA
Religions 2019, 10(10), 585; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10100585
Received: 16 September 2019 / Revised: 3 October 2019 / Accepted: 6 October 2019 / Published: 18 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Comparative Hagiology: Issues in Theory and Method)
As a genre defined by its content rather than by its form, the extreme diversity of the kinds of texts that can be considered “hagiographic” often proves an impediment to the progress of comparative hagiology. This essay offers some suggestions for the creation of a controlled vocabulary for the formal description of hagiographic texts, demonstrating how having a more highly developed shared language at our disposal will facilitate both the systematic analysis and the comparative discussion of hagiography. View Full-Text
Keywords: comparative religions; controlled vocabulary; disciplinary innovation; hagiography; hagiology; sacred biography; sainthood; religious studies comparative religions; controlled vocabulary; disciplinary innovation; hagiography; hagiology; sacred biography; sainthood; religious studies
MDPI and ACS Style

DiValerio, D.M. A Preliminary Controlled Vocabulary for the Description of Hagiographic Texts. Religions 2019, 10, 585.

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