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The (Processed) Vegetal Body and Blood of the Markan Messiah

Department of Religion, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
Religions 2019, 10(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10010001
Received: 1 December 2018 / Revised: 15 December 2018 / Accepted: 17 December 2018 / Published: 20 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Verdant: Knowing Plants, Planted Relations, Religion in Place)
Although the Eucharist is attested four times (Matthew 26:26–29; Mark 14:22–25; Luke 22:15–20; 1 Corinthians 11:23–26) in the New Testament, only two (Luke and 1 Corinthians) out of the four instances bespeak of commemorating this event (“Do this in remembrance of me”). Limiting the discussion to Mark’s iteration of this event, Mark’s version does not command to remember; rather he focuses on the ontological (“This is my body/blood”). This paper follows Stephen D. Moore’s vegetal reading of the Johannine Jesus (Gospel Jesuses and Other Nonhumans) that invites and acknowledges the animacy of the vegetal in affectively re-engaging the identity of the messiah. That is, (processed) plants/food are not there just to be symbolically equated with the body and blood of the messiah. They re-animate and re-define the nature of messiahship. This paper utilizes Jane Bennett’s vital materialism, Bruno Latour’s actants, and Michael Marder’s vegetality in arguing that Mark vegetally reconfigures the ontology of the messiah in the Eucharist/Last Supper scene (14:22–25). Deleuze and Guattari’s concept of assemblage will assist in elaborating how the vegetal could dismantle anthropocentric understanding of ontology. By doing so, this paper opens up the possibility to reimagine a messiah who finds his identity with the vegetal or those that are considered dispensable. View Full-Text
Keywords: Eucharist; Gospel of Mark; vegetality; vital materialism; Colonialism; race and ethnicity; assemblage; actants Eucharist; Gospel of Mark; vegetality; vital materialism; Colonialism; race and ethnicity; assemblage; actants
MDPI and ACS Style

Jeong, D.H. The (Processed) Vegetal Body and Blood of the Markan Messiah. Religions 2019, 10, 1. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10010001

AMA Style

Jeong DH. The (Processed) Vegetal Body and Blood of the Markan Messiah. Religions. 2019; 10(1):1. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10010001

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jeong, Dong H. 2019. "The (Processed) Vegetal Body and Blood of the Markan Messiah" Religions 10, no. 1: 1. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10010001

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