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Article

Soybean Relative Maturity, Not Row Spacing, Affected Interseeded Cover Crops Biomass

Department of Plant Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58104, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Stefano Tavoletti, Martin Weih and M. Inés Mínguez
Agriculture 2021, 11(5), 441; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11050441
Received: 20 April 2021 / Revised: 10 May 2021 / Accepted: 11 May 2021 / Published: 13 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intercropping Systems for Sustainable Agriculture)
Adoption of cover crop interseeding in the northwestern Corn Belt in the USA is limited due to inadequate fall moisture for establishment, short growing season, additional costs, and need for adapted winter-hardy species. This study evaluated three cover crop treatments—no cover crop, winter rye (Secale cereale L.), and winter camelina (Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz)—which were interseeded at the R6 soybean growth stage, using two different soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) maturity groups (0.5 vs. 0.9) and two row spacings (30.5 vs. 61 cm). The objective was to evaluate these treatments on cover crop biomass, soil cover, plant density, and soybean yield. Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain yield was also measured the following year. The early-maturing soybean cultivar (0.5 maturity) resulted in increased cover crop biomass and soil cover, with winter rye outperforming winter camelina. However, the early-maturing soybean yielded 2308 kg·ha−1, significantly less compared with the later maturing cultivar (2445 kg·ha−1). Narrow row spacing had higher soybean yield, but row spacing did not affect cover crop growth. Spring wheat should not follow winter rye if rye is terminated right before seeding the wheat. However, wheat planted after winter camelina was no different than when no cover crop was interseeded in soybean. Interseeding cover crops into established soybean is possible, however, cover crop biomass accumulation and soil cover are limited. View Full-Text
Keywords: winter camelina; winter rye; soil cover; soybean cultivar; soybean maturity; wheat yield winter camelina; winter rye; soil cover; soybean cultivar; soybean maturity; wheat yield
MDPI and ACS Style

Kandel, H.J.; Samarappuli, D.P.; Johnson, K.L.; Berti, M.T. Soybean Relative Maturity, Not Row Spacing, Affected Interseeded Cover Crops Biomass. Agriculture 2021, 11, 441. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11050441

AMA Style

Kandel HJ, Samarappuli DP, Johnson KL, Berti MT. Soybean Relative Maturity, Not Row Spacing, Affected Interseeded Cover Crops Biomass. Agriculture. 2021; 11(5):441. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11050441

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kandel, Hans J., Dulan P. Samarappuli, Kory L. Johnson, and Marisol T. Berti 2021. "Soybean Relative Maturity, Not Row Spacing, Affected Interseeded Cover Crops Biomass" Agriculture 11, no. 5: 441. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11050441

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