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Article

Assessing the Level and Determinants of COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence in Kenya

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Health Economics Research Unit (HERU), KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Program, Nairobi P.O. Box 43640-00100, Kenya
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Institute of Healthcare Management, Strathmore University, Nairobi P.O. Box 59857-0200, Kenya
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Population Council, New York, NY 10017, USA
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Population Council, Nairobi P.O. Box 17643-00500, Kenya
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KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Kilifi P.O. Box 230-80108, Kenya
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Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University, Oxford OX3 7LG, UK
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ralph A. Tripp
Vaccines 2021, 9(8), 936; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9080936
Received: 6 June 2021 / Revised: 11 August 2021 / Accepted: 16 August 2021 / Published: 23 August 2021
The government of Kenya has launched a phased rollout of COVID-19 vaccination. A major barrier is vaccine hesitancy; the refusal or delay of accepting vaccination. This study evaluated the level and determinants of vaccine hesitancy in Kenya. We conducted a cross-sectional study administered through a phone-based survey in February 2021 in four counties of Kenya. Multilevel logistic regression was used to identify individual perceived risks and influences, context-specific factors and vaccine-specific issues associated with COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in Kenya was high: 36.5%. Factors associated with vaccine hesitancy included: Rural regions, perceived difficulty in adhering to government regulations on COVID-19 prevention, no perceived COVID-19 infection risk, concerns regarding vaccine safety and effectiveness, and religious and cultural reasons. There is a need for the prioritization of interventions to address vaccine hesitancy and improve vaccine confidence as part of the vaccine roll-out plan. These messaging and/or interventions should be holistic to include the value of other public health measures, be focused and targeted to specific groups, raise awareness on the risks of COVID-19 and effectively communicate the benefits and risks of vaccines. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; vaccination; vaccine hesitancy; vaccine confidence; vaccine hesitancy predictors; Kenya COVID-19; vaccination; vaccine hesitancy; vaccine confidence; vaccine hesitancy predictors; Kenya
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MDPI and ACS Style

Orangi, S.; Pinchoff, J.; Mwanga, D.; Abuya, T.; Hamaluba, M.; Warimwe, G.; Austrian, K.; Barasa, E. Assessing the Level and Determinants of COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence in Kenya. Vaccines 2021, 9, 936. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9080936

AMA Style

Orangi S, Pinchoff J, Mwanga D, Abuya T, Hamaluba M, Warimwe G, Austrian K, Barasa E. Assessing the Level and Determinants of COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence in Kenya. Vaccines. 2021; 9(8):936. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9080936

Chicago/Turabian Style

Orangi, Stacey, Jessie Pinchoff, Daniel Mwanga, Timothy Abuya, Mainga Hamaluba, George Warimwe, Karen Austrian, and Edwine Barasa. 2021. "Assessing the Level and Determinants of COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence in Kenya" Vaccines 9, no. 8: 936. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9080936

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