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VLP-Based Vaccines as a Suitable Technology to Target Trypanosomatid Diseases

1
Immunoparasitology Laboratory, Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analysis, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal 59078-970, Brazil
2
Postgraduate Program in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal 59078-970, Brazil
3
Postgraduate Program in Biochemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal 59078-970, Brazil
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Instituto Biofisika (CSIC-UPV/EHU), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of the Basque Country, 48940 Bizkaia, Spain
5
Global Health and Tropical Medicine, Institute of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, New University of Lisbon, 1349-008 Lisbon, Portugal
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Victoria K. Baxter
Vaccines 2021, 9(3), 220; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9030220
Received: 27 January 2021 / Revised: 1 March 2021 / Accepted: 3 March 2021 / Published: 5 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Host Immune Response to Infectious Diseases)
Research on vaccines against trypanosomatids, a family of protozoa that cause neglected tropical diseases, such as Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, and sleeping sickness, is a current need. Today, according to modern vaccinology, virus-like particle (VLP) technology is involved in many vaccines, including those undergoing studies related to COVID-19. The potential use of VLPs as vaccine adjuvants opens an opportunity for the use of protozoan antigens for the development of vaccines against diseases caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania spp., and Trypanosoma brucei. In this context, it is important to consider the evasion mechanisms of these protozoa in the host and the antigens involved in the mechanisms of the parasite–host interaction. Thus, the immunostimulatory properties of VLPs can be part of an important strategy for the development and evaluation of new vaccines. This work aims to highlight the potential of VLPs as vaccine adjuvants for the development of immunity in complex diseases, specifically in the context of tropical diseases caused by trypanosomatids. View Full-Text
Keywords: virus-like particles; vaccine; trypanosomatids; Chagas disease; leishmaniasis; African trypanosomiasis virus-like particles; vaccine; trypanosomatids; Chagas disease; leishmaniasis; African trypanosomiasis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Queiroz, A.M.V.; Oliveira, J.W.d.F.; Moreno, C.J.; Guérin, D.M.A.; Silva, M.S. VLP-Based Vaccines as a Suitable Technology to Target Trypanosomatid Diseases. Vaccines 2021, 9, 220. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9030220

AMA Style

Queiroz AMV, Oliveira JWdF, Moreno CJ, Guérin DMA, Silva MS. VLP-Based Vaccines as a Suitable Technology to Target Trypanosomatid Diseases. Vaccines. 2021; 9(3):220. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9030220

Chicago/Turabian Style

Queiroz, Aline M.V., Johny W.d.F. Oliveira, Cláudia J. Moreno, Diego M.A. Guérin, and Marcelo S. Silva. 2021. "VLP-Based Vaccines as a Suitable Technology to Target Trypanosomatid Diseases" Vaccines 9, no. 3: 220. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9030220

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