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Open AccessArticle

Lagging Immune Response to Haemophilus influenzae Serotype b (Hib) Conjugate Vaccine after the Primary Vaccination with Hib of Infants in The Netherlands

1
Infectious Diseases Research, Diagnostics and laboratory Surveillance (IDS), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, 3721MA Bilthoven, The Netherlands
2
Immunology of Infectious Diseases and Vaccines (IIV), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, 3721MA Bilthoven, The Netherlands
3
Department of Human Genetics, Radboud Institute of Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University medical center, 6525GA Nijmegen, The Netherlands
4
Infectious Diseases, Epidemiology and Surveillance (EPI), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, 3721MA Bilthoven, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Vaccines 2020, 8(3), 347; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8030347
Received: 29 April 2020 / Revised: 29 May 2020 / Accepted: 19 June 2020 / Published: 30 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Vaccines against Infectious Diseases)
In 1993, a Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) conjugate vaccine was introduced in the Dutch national immunization program, resulting in a sharp decrease in invasive Hib disease. We used a population-based set of serum samples collected in The Netherlands in 2006–2007 (Pienter-II, 5696 sera) to assess the concentration of antibodies to the capsular polysaccharide of Hib, and compared the results with those obtained from a similar set collected in 1995–1996 (Pienter-I, 7837 sera). Post-primary vaccination serum samples from children aged 6–11 months from the Pienter-II study contained approximately 4-fold lower anti-Hib antibody concentrations than samples from children from the Pienter-I study. No such difference was found in post-booster samples from children older than 11 months of age. In Pienter-II, the proportion of children aged 6–11 months with anti-Hib antibody concentrations below the putative protective concentration of 0.15 µg/mL was 30%, which is significantly higher than in the Pienter-I study (12%). Fewer children in the Pienter-II group developed antibodies able to kill Hib in a serum bactericidal assay compared to the Pienter-I children. The cause of the lagged response in Pienter-II children remain uncertain, but lack of natural boosting, interference by the acellular pertussis vaccine, combining vaccines and acceleration of the schedule may have contributed. View Full-Text
Keywords: Hib; vaccination; reduced immunogenicity; The Netherlands Hib; vaccination; reduced immunogenicity; The Netherlands
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Schouls, L.; Schot, C.; de Voer, R.M.; van der Klis, F.; Knol, M.; Tcherniaeva, I.; Berbers, G. Lagging Immune Response to Haemophilus influenzae Serotype b (Hib) Conjugate Vaccine after the Primary Vaccination with Hib of Infants in The Netherlands. Vaccines 2020, 8, 347.

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