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Open AccessReview

Technological Approaches for Improving Vaccination Compliance and Coverage

1
Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Western Switzerland, University of Geneva, Rue Michel-Servet 1, 1221 Geneva, Switzerland
2
Vaccine Formulation Institute, Chemin des Aulx 14, 1228 Plan-les-Ouates, Switzerland
3
Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark
4
Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Cosmetology, University of Belgrade-Faculty of Pharmacy, Vojvode Stepe 450, 11221 Belgrade, Serbia
5
The Jenner Institute, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ, UK
6
Virology & Pathogenesis Group, Public Health England, Manor Farm Road, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG, UK
7
Department of Microbiology, Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Rudolfa Weigla 12, 53-114 Wroclaw, Poland
8
The Adjuvant Research Group, School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, DO2R590 Dublin, Ireland
9
Department of Immunology of Infectious Diseases, Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Rudolfa Weigla 12, 53-114 Wroclaw, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally.
Vaccines 2020, 8(2), 304; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8020304
Received: 22 May 2020 / Revised: 13 June 2020 / Accepted: 14 June 2020 / Published: 16 June 2020
Vaccination has been well recognised as a critically important tool in preventing infectious disease, yet incomplete immunisation coverage remains a major obstacle to achieving disease control and eradication. As medical products for global access, vaccines need to be safe, effective and inexpensive. In line with these goals, continuous improvements of vaccine delivery strategies are necessary to achieve the full potential of immunisation. Novel technologies related to vaccine delivery and route of administration, use of advanced adjuvants and controlled antigen release (single-dose immunisation) approaches are expected to contribute to improved coverage and patient compliance. This review discusses the application of micro- and nano-technologies in the alternative routes of vaccine administration (mucosal and cutaneous vaccination), oral vaccine delivery as well as vaccine encapsulation with the aim of controlled antigen release for single-dose vaccination. View Full-Text
Keywords: vaccine delivery; compliance; microfluidics; mucosal vaccination; cutaneous vaccination; adjuvants vaccine delivery; compliance; microfluidics; mucosal vaccination; cutaneous vaccination; adjuvants
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Lemoine, C.; Thakur, A.; Krajišnik, D.; Guyon, R.; Longet, S.; Razim, A.; Górska, S.; Pantelić, I.; Ilić, T.; Nikolić, I.; Lavelle, E.C.; Gamian, A.; Savić, S.; Milicic, A. Technological Approaches for Improving Vaccination Compliance and Coverage. Vaccines 2020, 8, 304.

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