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Comparison of the Biological Impact of UVA and UVB upon the Skin with Functional Proteomics and Immunohistochemistry

1
Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung 40447, Taiwan
2
Department of Chinese Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Kaohsiung 83301, Taiwan
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Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Keelung City 20401, Taiwan
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Pharmaceutics Laboratory, Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan
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TMU Research Center of Cancer Translational Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11042, Taiwan
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Graduate Institute of Cancer Biology and Drug Discovery, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11042, Taiwan
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Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan
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Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan
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School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan
10
Liver Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan 33375, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antioxidants 2019, 8(12), 569; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8120569
Received: 7 October 2019 / Revised: 5 November 2019 / Accepted: 5 November 2019 / Published: 20 November 2019
The skin provides protection against external stimuli; however, solar radiation, including ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB), can result in profound influences on skin structure and function, which eventually impairs its molecular characteristics and normal physiology. In the current study, we performed proteome tools combined with an immunohistological approach on nude mouse skin to evaluate the adverse responses elicited by UVA and UVB irradiation, respectively. Our findings indicated that UVA significantly promotes oxidative damage in DNA, the breakdown of collagen fiber in the dermis, and the apoptosis of fibroblasts, which leads to inflammation. Meanwhile, UVB administration was found to enhance the carbonylation of various proteins and the proliferation of keratinocyte. Particularly, raspberry extract, which has been confirmed to have antioxidative efficacy, could effectively attenuate ultraviolet (UV) radiation-caused cell death. Network analysis also implied that UVA and UVB induce quite different responses, and that UVA results in cell death as well as inflammation mediated by caspase-3 and activator protein 1/nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (AP-1/NF-B), while UVB predominantly increases the risk of skin carcinogenesis involved with oncogenes such as p53 and c-Myc. Taken together, functional proteomics coordinated with histological experiments could allow for a high-throughput study to explore the alterations of crucial proteins and molecules linked to skin impacts subjected to UVA and UVB exposure.
Keywords: UV radiation; skin; oxidative stress; proteomics; network analysis; immunohistochemistry UV radiation; skin; oxidative stress; proteomics; network analysis; immunohistochemistry
MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, P.-W.; Hung, Y.-C.; Lin, T.-Y.; Fang, J.-Y.; Yang, P.-M.; Chen, M.-H.; Pan, T.-L. Comparison of the Biological Impact of UVA and UVB upon the Skin with Functional Proteomics and Immunohistochemistry. Antioxidants 2019, 8, 569.

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