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A Comprehensive Review on Lipid Oxidation in Meat and Meat Products
Open AccessArticle

Effects of Storage Time and Temperature on Lipid Oxidation and Protein Co-Oxidation of Low-Moisture Shredded Meat Products

1
Department of Food Science, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang 43400, Selangor, Malaysia
2
Panel of Food Technology, Department of Technology and Natural Resources, Faculty of Applied Sciences and Technology, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Pagoh Education Hub, KM 1, Jalan Panchor, Muar 84600, Johor, Malaysia
3
Department of Food Science and Technology, School of Industrial Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam 40450, Selangor, Malaysia
4
Department of Food Technology, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang 43400, Selangor, Malaysia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antioxidants 2019, 8(10), 486; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8100486
Received: 27 June 2019 / Revised: 4 August 2019 / Accepted: 13 August 2019 / Published: 16 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein and Lipid Oxidation in Meat and Meat Products)
Studies on the oxidative changes in meat-based, low-moisture, ready to eat foods are complicated due to complex food system and slow lipid-protein oxidative deterioration. The current study evaluates the oxidative changes over six months of storage on shredded beef and chicken products (locally known as serunding) for physicochemical analysis, lipid oxidation (conjugated dienes and malondialdehydes) and protein co-oxidation (soluble protein content, amino acid composition, protein carbonyl, tryptophan loss and Schiff base fluorescence) at 25 °C, 40 °C and 60 °C. The lipid stability of chicken serunding was significantly lower than beef serunding, illustrated by higher conjugated dienes content and higher rate of malondialdehyde formation during storage. In terms of protein co-oxidation, chicken serunding with higher polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) experienced more severe oxidation, as seen from lower protein solubility, higher protein carbonyl and Schiff base formation compared to beef serunding. To conclude, chicken serunding demonstrates lower lipid and protein stability and exhibits higher rate of lipid oxidation and protein co-oxidation than beef serunding. These findings provide insights on the progression of lipid oxidation and protein co-oxidation in cooked, shredded meat products and could be extrapolated to minimize possible adverse effects arising from lipid oxidation and protein co-oxidation, on the quality of low-moisture, high-lipid, high-protein foods. View Full-Text
Keywords: lipid oxidation; low moisture food; protein co-oxidation; ready-to-eat; shredded meat; serunding lipid oxidation; low moisture food; protein co-oxidation; ready-to-eat; shredded meat; serunding
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wazir, H.; Chay, S.Y.; Zarei, M.; Hussin, F.S.; Mustapha, N.A.; Wan Ibadullah, W.Z.; Saari, N. Effects of Storage Time and Temperature on Lipid Oxidation and Protein Co-Oxidation of Low-Moisture Shredded Meat Products. Antioxidants 2019, 8, 486.

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