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Open AccessArticle

Chiropractic Manipulation Increases Maximal Bite Force in Healthy Individuals

1
Centre for Chiropractic Research, New Zealand College of Chiropractic, 1060 Auckland, New Zealand
2
School of Medicine, Koç University, 34450 Istanbul, Turkey
3
Centre for Chiropractic Research, New Zealand College of Chiropractic, 1060 Auckland, New Zealand
4
Health & Rehabilitation Research Institute, Auckland University of Technology, 1142 Auckland, New Zealand
5
SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark
6
Dr. Sid E. Williams Center for Chiropractic Research, Life University, Marietta, GA 30060, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2018, 8(5), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8050076
Received: 28 March 2018 / Revised: 17 April 2018 / Accepted: 24 April 2018 / Published: 27 April 2018
Recent research has shown that chiropractic spinal manipulation can alter central sensorimotor integration and motor cortical drive to human voluntary muscles of the upper and lower limb. The aim of this paper was to explore whether spinal manipulation could also influence maximal bite force. Twenty-eight people were divided into two groups of 14, one that received chiropractic care and one that received sham chiropractic care. All subjects were naive to chiropractic. Maximum bite force was assessed pre- and post-intervention and at 1-week follow up. Bite force in the chiropractic group increased compared to the control group (p = 0.02) post-intervention and this between-group difference was also present at the 1-week follow-up (p < 0.01). Bite force in the chiropractic group increased significantly by 11.0% (±18.6%) post-intervention (p = 0.04) and remained increased by 13.0% (±12.9%, p = 0.04) at the 1 week follow up. Bite force did not change significantly in the control group immediately after the intervention (−2.3 ± 9.0%, p = 0.20), and decreased by 6.3% (±3.4%, p = 0.01) at the 1-week follow-up. These results indicate that chiropractic spinal manipulation can increase maximal bite force. View Full-Text
Keywords: total maximal bite force; chiropractic care; spinal manipulation total maximal bite force; chiropractic care; spinal manipulation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Haavik, H.; Özyurt, M.G.; Niazi, I.K.; Holt, K.; Nedergaard, R.W.; Yilmaz, G.; Türker, K.S. Chiropractic Manipulation Increases Maximal Bite Force in Healthy Individuals. Brain Sci. 2018, 8, 76.

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