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Article

Teacher Discrimination Reduces School Performance of African American Youth: Role of Gender

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
2
Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture and Health, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
3
Department of Psychology, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
4
Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2018, 8(10), 183; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8100183
Received: 16 July 2018 / Revised: 18 September 2018 / Accepted: 26 September 2018 / Published: 30 September 2018
Background: Gender may alter African Americans’ vulnerability to discrimination. The type of outcomes that follow exposure to discrimination may also be gender-specific. Although teacher discrimination is known to deteriorate school performance, it is yet unknown whether male and female African American youth differ in the effect of teacher discrimination on school performance. Objective: This cross-sectional study explored the moderating role of gender on the effect of teacher discrimination on school performance in a national sample of African American youth. Methods: The National Survey of American Life-Adolescent Supplement (NSAL-A) enrolled a nationally representative sample (n = 810) of 13–17-year-old African American youth. Demographic factors, socioeconomic status, teacher discrimination, and school performance (grade point average, GPA) were measured. Linear multivariable regression models were applied for data analysis. Results: Males and females reported similar levels of perceived teacher discrimination. In the pooled sample, higher teacher discrimination was associated with lower school performance among African American youth (b = −0.35; 95% confidence interval (CI) = −0.49 to −0.22). Gender interacted with perceived teacher discrimination (b = 12; 95% CI = 0.24–2.02), suggesting a significant difference between males and females in the magnitude of the association between perceived teacher discrimination and GPA. In stratified models, perceived teacher discrimination was associated with worse school performance of females (b = −12; 95% CI = −0.03 to −2.78) but not males (b = 0.01; 95% CI = −0.07 to 0.08). Conclusion: In line with previous studies, gender was found to alter the vulnerability of African American youth to perceived discrimination. African American boys and girls may differ in their sensitivity to the effects of teacher discrimination on school performance. View Full-Text
Keywords: population groups; ethnic groups; race; ethnicity; racism; discrimination; Blacks; African Americans; gender; bias; teacher discrimination population groups; ethnic groups; race; ethnicity; racism; discrimination; Blacks; African Americans; gender; bias; teacher discrimination
MDPI and ACS Style

Assari, S.; Caldwell, C.H. Teacher Discrimination Reduces School Performance of African American Youth: Role of Gender. Brain Sci. 2018, 8, 183. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8100183

AMA Style

Assari S, Caldwell CH. Teacher Discrimination Reduces School Performance of African American Youth: Role of Gender. Brain Sciences. 2018; 8(10):183. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8100183

Chicago/Turabian Style

Assari, Shervin, and Cleopatra H. Caldwell 2018. "Teacher Discrimination Reduces School Performance of African American Youth: Role of Gender" Brain Sciences 8, no. 10: 183. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8100183

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