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Communication

Patient Experience of Flunarizine for Vestibular Migraine: Single Centre Observational Study

1
Department of Neuro-Otology, Royal National Ear Nose and Throat Hospital, University College London Hospitals, London WC1E 6DG, UK
2
Department of Pharmacy, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London WC1N 3BG, UK
3
Department of Clinical and Movement Neurosciences, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, UK
4
InAmind Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Luigi Alberto Pini
Brain Sci. 2022, 12(4), 415; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12040415
Received: 7 February 2022 / Revised: 7 March 2022 / Accepted: 17 March 2022 / Published: 22 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vestibular Neurology)
Vestibular migraine (VM) is a leading cause of episodic vertigo, affecting up to 1% of the general population. Despite established diagnostic criteria, there is currently no evidence-based approach for acute treatment of VM, with treatment recommendations generally extrapolated from studies on classical migraine headache. Several small-scale studies have identified flunarizine as a potentially effective prophylactic medication in VM. We conducted a single-centre observational service evaluation study exploring patient experiences of preventative medications over a 28-month period, including flunarizine, for control of VM symptoms. To compare patient experience of flunarizine with other medications, data from patients taking flunarizine were separately analysed. A total of 90% of VM patients taking flunarizine reported symptomatic improvement, compared to only 32% of patients on other medications. Whilst 50% of patients on flunarizine reported side effects. these were not deemed to outweigh the clinical benefits, with most patients deciding to continue treatment. Our data supports the use of flunarizine in VM. View Full-Text
Keywords: vestibular migraine; flunarizine; prophylaxis; symptoms; patient experience vestibular migraine; flunarizine; prophylaxis; symptoms; patient experience
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rashid, S.M.U.; Sumaria, S.; Koohi, N.; Arshad, Q.; Kaski, D. Patient Experience of Flunarizine for Vestibular Migraine: Single Centre Observational Study. Brain Sci. 2022, 12, 415. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12040415

AMA Style

Rashid SMU, Sumaria S, Koohi N, Arshad Q, Kaski D. Patient Experience of Flunarizine for Vestibular Migraine: Single Centre Observational Study. Brain Sciences. 2022; 12(4):415. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12040415

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rashid, Sk Mamun Ur, Sheetal Sumaria, Nehzat Koohi, Qadeer Arshad, and Diego Kaski. 2022. "Patient Experience of Flunarizine for Vestibular Migraine: Single Centre Observational Study" Brain Sciences 12, no. 4: 415. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12040415

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