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Parkinson’s Disease Motor Symptom Progression Slowed with Multisensory Dance Learning over 3-Years: A Preliminary Longitudinal Investigation

by 1,2,3,* and 1,2,3,4,5
1
Center for Vision Research, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada
2
Departments of Psychology, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada
3
Neuroscience Graduate Diploma Program and Interdisciplinary Studies, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada
4
Departments of Biology, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada
5
Canadian Action and Perception Network (CAPnet), Multisensory Neuroscience Laboratory, Vision: Science to Applications, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sirwan Darweesh
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(7), 895; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11070895
Received: 31 May 2021 / Revised: 15 June 2021 / Accepted: 16 June 2021 / Published: 7 July 2021
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease that has a fast progression of motor dysfunction within the first 5 years of diagnosis, showing an annual motor rate of decline of the Movement Disorder Society Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) between 5.2 and 8.9 points. We aimed to determine both motor and non-motor PD symptom progression while participating in dance classes once per week over a period of three years. Longitudinal data was assessed for a total of 32 people with PD using MDS-UPDRS scores. Daily motor rate of decline was zero (slope = 0.000146) in PD-Dancers, indicating no motor impairment, whereas the PD-Reference group showed the expected motor decline across three years (p < 0.01). Similarly, non-motor aspects of daily living, motor experiences of daily living, and motor complications showed no significant decline. A significant group (PD-Dancers and PD-Reference) by days interaction showed that PD who train once per week have less motor impairment (M = 18.75) than PD-References who do not train (M = 24.61) over time (p < 0.05). Training is effective at slowing both motor and non-motor PD symptoms over three years as shown in decreased scores of the MDS-UPDRS. View Full-Text
Keywords: multisensory therapy; motor symptoms; Parkinson’s disease; neurorehabilitation; longitudinal multisensory therapy; motor symptoms; Parkinson’s disease; neurorehabilitation; longitudinal
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bearss, K.A.; DeSouza, J.F.X. Parkinson’s Disease Motor Symptom Progression Slowed with Multisensory Dance Learning over 3-Years: A Preliminary Longitudinal Investigation. Brain Sci. 2021, 11, 895. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11070895

AMA Style

Bearss KA, DeSouza JFX. Parkinson’s Disease Motor Symptom Progression Slowed with Multisensory Dance Learning over 3-Years: A Preliminary Longitudinal Investigation. Brain Sciences. 2021; 11(7):895. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11070895

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bearss, Karolina A., and Joseph F.X. DeSouza. 2021. "Parkinson’s Disease Motor Symptom Progression Slowed with Multisensory Dance Learning over 3-Years: A Preliminary Longitudinal Investigation" Brain Sciences 11, no. 7: 895. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11070895

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