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Article

Network Analysis of Induced Neural Plasticity Post-Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Chronic Pain

1
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
2
Department of Psychology, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA
3
Seacoast Area Physiatry, Portsmouth, NH 03801, USA
4
Department of Health Management and Policy, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
5
Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience and Behavior, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
6
Department of Biological Sciences, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11010010
Received: 26 October 2020 / Revised: 5 December 2020 / Accepted: 18 December 2020 / Published: 23 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging Human Brain Connectivity in Health and Disease)
Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a costly and prevalent condition that affects the lives of over 50 million individuals in the United States. Chronic pain leads to functional brain changes in those suffering from the condition. Not only does the primary pain network transform as the condition changes from acute to persistent pain, a state of hyper-connectivity also exists between the default mode, frontoparietal, and salience networks. Graph theory analysis has recently been used to investigate treatment-driven brain network changes. For example, current research suggests that Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) may reduce the chronic pain associated hyper-connectivity between the default mode, frontoparietal, and salience networks, as well as within the salience network. This study extended previous work by examining the associations between the three networks above and a meta-analytically derived pain network. Results indicate decreased connectivity within the pain network (including left putamen, right insula, left insula, and right thalamus) in addition to triple network connectivity changes after the four-week Acceptance and Commitment Therapy intervention. View Full-Text
Keywords: acceptance and commitment therapy; chronic pain; fMRI; functional connectivity; graph theory acceptance and commitment therapy; chronic pain; fMRI; functional connectivity; graph theory
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MDPI and ACS Style

Meier, S.K.; Ray, K.L.; Waller, N.C.; Gendron, B.C.; Aytur, S.A.; Robin, D.A. Network Analysis of Induced Neural Plasticity Post-Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Chronic Pain. Brain Sci. 2021, 11, 10. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11010010

AMA Style

Meier SK, Ray KL, Waller NC, Gendron BC, Aytur SA, Robin DA. Network Analysis of Induced Neural Plasticity Post-Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Chronic Pain. Brain Sciences. 2021; 11(1):10. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11010010

Chicago/Turabian Style

Meier, Sarah K., Kimberly L. Ray, Noah C. Waller, Barry C. Gendron, Semra A. Aytur, and Donald A. Robin 2021. "Network Analysis of Induced Neural Plasticity Post-Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Chronic Pain" Brain Sciences 11, no. 1: 10. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11010010

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