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Article

Effects of Short-Rest Interval Time on Resisted Sprint Performance and Sprint Mechanical Variables in Elite Youth Soccer Players

Graduate School of Sports Medicine, CHA University, Seongnam 13496, Republic of Korea
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(12), 5082; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14125082
Submission received: 14 May 2024 / Revised: 6 June 2024 / Accepted: 7 June 2024 / Published: 11 June 2024
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Performance Analysis and Technology in Sports)

Abstract

This study explored the impact of short rest intervals on resisted sprint training in elite youth soccer players, specifically targeting enhanced initial-phase explosive acceleration without altering sprint mechanics. Fifteen U19 soccer players participated in a randomized crossover design trial, executing two sprint conditions: RST2M (6 sprints of 20 meter resisted sprints with 2 min rest intervals) and RST40S (6 sprints of 20 meter resisted sprints with 40 s rest intervals), both under a load equivalent to 30% of sprint velocity decrement using a resistance device. To gauge neuromuscular fatigue, countermovement jumps were performed before and after each session, and the fatigue index along with sprint decrement percentage were calculated. Interestingly, the results indicated no significant differences in sprint performance or mechanical variables between RST2M and RST40S, suggesting that the duration of rest intervals did not affect the outcomes. Horizontal resistance appeared to mitigate compensatory patterns typically induced by fatigue in short rest periods, maintaining effective joint movement and hip extensor recruitment necessary for producing horizontal ground forces. These findings propose a novel training strategy that could simultaneously enhance sprint mechanics during initial accelerations and repeated sprint abilities for elite youth soccer players—a methodology not previously employed
Keywords: resisted sprint; sprint mechanics; repeated sprint; rest interval time; soccer resisted sprint; sprint mechanics; repeated sprint; rest interval time; soccer

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MDPI and ACS Style

Jung, D.; Hong, J. Effects of Short-Rest Interval Time on Resisted Sprint Performance and Sprint Mechanical Variables in Elite Youth Soccer Players. Appl. Sci. 2024, 14, 5082. https://doi.org/10.3390/app14125082

AMA Style

Jung D, Hong J. Effects of Short-Rest Interval Time on Resisted Sprint Performance and Sprint Mechanical Variables in Elite Youth Soccer Players. Applied Sciences. 2024; 14(12):5082. https://doi.org/10.3390/app14125082

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jung, Daum, and Junggi Hong. 2024. "Effects of Short-Rest Interval Time on Resisted Sprint Performance and Sprint Mechanical Variables in Elite Youth Soccer Players" Applied Sciences 14, no. 12: 5082. https://doi.org/10.3390/app14125082

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