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Systematic Review

Smart Toys in Early Childhood and Primary Education: A Systematic Review of Technological and Educational Affordances

1
Department of Early Childhood Education, University of Patras, 26500 Patra, Greece
2
INSPÉ de l’académie de Versailles, CY Cergy Paris Université, 95000 Cergy, France
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Andrea Prati
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(18), 8653; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11188653
Received: 12 July 2021 / Revised: 9 August 2021 / Accepted: 12 August 2021 / Published: 17 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Machine Interaction)
The present paper presents a systematic review of the last 30 years that concerns records on Smart Toys and focuses on toys regarding early childhood and primary education children (3–12 years old). This paper aims to analyse and categorise smart toys (50 articles) in terms of their technological and educational affordances. The results show that the toys are designed based on four main technological affordances and their combinations. The educational affordances of smart toys are studied in terms of different use modes and their learning objectives aimed to identify specific objectives in different subjects and objectives based on transversal competencies such as problem solving, spatial thinking, computational thinking, collaboration and symbolic thinking. Finally, with the multiple correspondence analysis, the correlations between smart toys’ individual technological and educational affordances are grouped with the evolution of affordances related to their development date. In conclusion, in recent years, smart toys concern special sciences (programming) and some 21st-century skills (STEM and computational thinking). In contrast, in the first 20 years, the interest focused more on transverse skills, such as collaboration, emotional thinking, symbolic thinking, story-telling and problem solving. View Full-Text
Keywords: smart toys; affordances; early childhood and primary education smart toys; affordances; early childhood and primary education
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MDPI and ACS Style

Komis, V.; Karachristos, C.; Mourta, D.; Sgoura, K.; Misirli, A.; Jaillet, A. Smart Toys in Early Childhood and Primary Education: A Systematic Review of Technological and Educational Affordances. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 8653. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11188653

AMA Style

Komis V, Karachristos C, Mourta D, Sgoura K, Misirli A, Jaillet A. Smart Toys in Early Childhood and Primary Education: A Systematic Review of Technological and Educational Affordances. Applied Sciences. 2021; 11(18):8653. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11188653

Chicago/Turabian Style

Komis, Vassilis, Christofors Karachristos, Despina Mourta, Konstantina Sgoura, Anastasia Misirli, and Alain Jaillet. 2021. "Smart Toys in Early Childhood and Primary Education: A Systematic Review of Technological and Educational Affordances" Applied Sciences 11, no. 18: 8653. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11188653

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