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Behav. Sci. 2018, 8(8), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs8080070

Depressed as Freshmen, Stressed as Seniors: The Relationship between Depression, Perceived Stress and Academic Results among Medical Students

1
Department of Behavioral Sciences, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Grigore T. Popa of Iași, Iasi 700115, Romania
2
Department of Vocational Counselling, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Grigore T. Popa of Iași, Iasi 700115, Romania
3
General Medicine Faculty, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Grigore T. Popa of Iași, Iasi 700115, Romania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 2 July 2018 / Revised: 28 July 2018 / Accepted: 1 August 2018 / Published: 3 August 2018
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Abstract

Research in the field has identified the presence of stress and depression among medical students. However, no other study has pointed out the differences between years of study. The objectives of the study are to identify the levels of stress and depression among medical students and to point out the relationship between these two variables. Methods: The cross-sectional study gathered data regarding socio-demographic characteristics, depression, self-identified psychological and physical symptoms during stressful periods and perceived stress among medical students in a university in Romania. Statistical analysis was performed using IBM SPSS Statistics v23. For comparative analysis the t-test for independent samples and one-way ANOVA was used and for correlational analysis, Pearson and Spearman correlations was used. Results: Freshmen are the most depressed and graduating students are the most stressed medical students. Statistical analysis reveals an average score of perceived stress (M = 17.31 ± 6.79) and mild-moderate depression (M = 10.11 ± 7.69). Women are more prone to symptoms of depression. Students enrolled in the third year of study are the least depressed and the least stressed. Perceived stress is significantly positive correlated with depression and negative in strong correlation with the number of course credits received. More than half of students experience an increased rate of anxiety and consumption of alcohol, coffee, sweets or cigarettes during stressful academic periods. Over 60% declare themselves satisfied with their academic results. Conclusions: Strategies to diminish the level of stress and depression among medical students are necessary. Psychological support and educational counseling should start from admission, since freshmen experience the highest rate of depression. View Full-Text
Keywords: medical student; depression; perceived stress; academic results medical student; depression; perceived stress; academic results
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Iorga, M.; Dondas, C.; Zugun-Eloae, C. Depressed as Freshmen, Stressed as Seniors: The Relationship between Depression, Perceived Stress and Academic Results among Medical Students. Behav. Sci. 2018, 8, 70.

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