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Mill and Mental Phenomena: Critical Contributions to a Science of Cognition

Department of Clinical Health and Applied Sciences, University of Houston-Clear Lake, 2700 Bay Area Boulevard, Houston, TX 77058, USA
Behav. Sci. 2013, 3(2), 217-231; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs3020217
Received: 5 February 2013 / Revised: 16 April 2013 / Accepted: 18 April 2013 / Published: 22 April 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue What is Cognition?)
Attempts to define cognition preceded John Stuart Mill’s life and continue to this day. John Stuart Mill envisioned a science of mental phenomena informed by associationism, empirical introspection, and neurophysiology, and he advanced specific ideas that still influence modern conceptions of cognition. The present article briefly reviews Mill’s personal history and the times in which he lived, and it traces the evolution of ideas that have run through him to contemporary cognitive concepts. The article also highlights contemporary problems in defining cognition and supports specific criteria regarding what constitutes cognition. View Full-Text
Keywords: John Stuart Mill; attention; meta-cognition; cognitive neuroscience; cognitive therapy John Stuart Mill; attention; meta-cognition; cognitive neuroscience; cognitive therapy
MDPI and ACS Style

Bistricky, S.L. Mill and Mental Phenomena: Critical Contributions to a Science of Cognition. Behav. Sci. 2013, 3, 217-231.

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