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Feasibility of Telephone Follow-Up after Critical Care Discharge

1
Discipline of Physiotherapy, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, the University of Dublin, Dublin D08 W9RT, Ireland
2
Department of Physiotherapy, St James’s Hospital, Dublin D08 X4RX, Ireland
3
Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, St James’s Hospital, Dublin D08 X4RX, Ireland
4
Multidisciplinary Intensive Care Research Organization (MICRO), St James’s Hospital, Dublin D08 X4RX, Ireland
5
Pulmonary Intensive Care Unit, Respiratory Institute, Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, CIBERes, 08036 Barcelona, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Med. Sci. 2020, 8(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci8010016
Received: 10 February 2020 / Revised: 10 March 2020 / Accepted: 10 March 2020 / Published: 14 March 2020
Background: Critical care has evolved from a primary focus on short-term survival, with greater attention being placed on longer-term health care outcomes. It is not known how best to implement follow-up after critical care discharge. Study aims were to (1) assess the uptake and feasibility of telephone follow-up after a critical care stay and (2) profile overall physical status and recovery during the sub-acute recovery period using a telephone follow-up assessment. Methods: Adults who had been admitted to critical care units of St. James’s Hospital, Dublin, for >72 h were followed up by telephone 3–9 months post discharge from critical care. The telephone assessment consisted of a battery of questionnaires (including the SF-36 questionnaire and the Clinical Frailty Scale) and examined quality of life, frailty, employment status, and feasibility of telephone follow-up. Results: Sixty five percent (n = 91) of eligible participants were reachable by telephone. Of these, 80% (n = 73) participated in data collection. Only 7% (n = 5) expressed a preference for face-to-face hospital-based follow-up as opposed to telephone follow-up. For the SF-36, scores were lower in a number of physical health domains as compared to population norms. Frailty increased in 43.2% (n = 32) of participants compared to pre-admission status. Two-thirds (n = 48) reported being >70% physically recovered. Conclusion: Results showed that telephone follow-up is a useful contact method for a typically hard-to-reach population. Deficits in physical health and frailty were noted in the sub-acute period after discharge from critical care. View Full-Text
Keywords: frailty; quality of life; recovery; intensive care; critical care; telephone frailty; quality of life; recovery; intensive care; critical care; telephone
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hodalova, S.; Moore, S.; Dowds, J.; Murphy, N.; Martin-Loeches, I.; Broderick, J. Feasibility of Telephone Follow-Up after Critical Care Discharge. Med. Sci. 2020, 8, 16. https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci8010016

AMA Style

Hodalova S, Moore S, Dowds J, Murphy N, Martin-Loeches I, Broderick J. Feasibility of Telephone Follow-Up after Critical Care Discharge. Medical Sciences. 2020; 8(1):16. https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci8010016

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hodalova, Sofia, Sarah Moore, Joanne Dowds, Niamh Murphy, Ignacio Martin-Loeches, and Julie Broderick. 2020. "Feasibility of Telephone Follow-Up after Critical Care Discharge" Medical Sciences 8, no. 1: 16. https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci8010016

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