Next Article in Journal
Superposed Sedimentary and Tectonic Block-In-Matrix Fabrics in a Subducted Serpentinite Mélange (High-Pressure Zermatt Saas Ophiolite, Western Alps)
Previous Article in Journal
The Potential of Low-Cost UAVs and Open-Source Photogrammetry Software for High-Resolution Monitoring of Alpine Glaciers: A Case Study from the Kanderfirn (Swiss Alps)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Understanding Community-Level Flooding Awareness in Remote Coastal Towns in Northern Chile through Community Mapping
Open AccessArticle

Interdisciplinary Design of Vital Infrastructure to Reduce Flood Risk in Tokyo’s Edogawa Ward

1
Department of Urbanism, Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, Delft University of Technology, 52628 Mekelweg, The Netherlands
2
Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology, 52628 Mekelweg, The Netherlands
3
Department of Architecture, Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, Delft University of Technology, 52628 Mekelweg, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Geosciences 2019, 9(8), 357; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9080357
Received: 2 December 2018 / Revised: 6 July 2019 / Accepted: 16 July 2019 / Published: 13 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue River, Urban, and Coastal Flood Risk)
Engineering for flood resilience of dense coastal regions often neglects the resultant impact on urban design quality. Vital subsurface infrastructure such as hydraulic systems, water networks, civil construction, transport, energy supply and soil systems are especially important in shaping the urban environment and integrating resilience. However, the complexity and resource intensive nature of these engineering domains make it a challenge to incorporate them into design measures. In the process of planning, this impedes proactive collaboration between the design and engineering communities. This study presents a collaborative design engineering exercise undertaken to find spatial solutions to flood-prone Edogawa ward in Tokyo, Japan. The team included urbanists, hydraulic engineers, water resource managers, and landscape architects. Hydraulic engineering solutions were combined with spatial planning methods to deliver two alternative strategies for the chosen site. Each alternative was then evaluated for its urban design quality and effectiveness in reducing flood risk. The exercise highlighted that successful design requires comprehensive interdisciplinary collaboration to arrive at a sustainable bargain between hard and soft measures. View Full-Text
Keywords: hard vs. soft countermeasures; flood risk; storm surge; critical infrastructure; resilient cities hard vs. soft countermeasures; flood risk; storm surge; critical infrastructure; resilient cities
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Krishnan, S.; Lin, J.; Simanjuntak, J.; Hooimeijer, F.; Bricker, J.; Daniel, M.; Yoshida, Y. Interdisciplinary Design of Vital Infrastructure to Reduce Flood Risk in Tokyo’s Edogawa Ward. Geosciences 2019, 9, 357.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop