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Open AccessArticle

Sequestering Atmospheric CO2 Inorganically: A Solution for Malaysia’s CO2 Emission

1
Division of Natural and Built Environment, School of Science Engineering and Technology, Abertay University, Dundee DD1 1HG, UK
2
Department of Geotechnics and Transportation, School of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia
3
Department of Environmental Engineering and Green Technology, Malaysia-Japan International Institute of Technology, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 54100 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
4
Department of Chemical Process Engineering, Malaysia-Japan International Institute of Technology, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 54100 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
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Department of Geotechnics and Transportation, School of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia
6
School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Geosciences 2018, 8(12), 483; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8120483
Received: 13 November 2018 / Revised: 6 December 2018 / Accepted: 11 December 2018 / Published: 14 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Sequestration)
Malaysia is anticipating an increase of 68.86% in CO2 emission in 2020, compared with the 2000 baseline, reaching 285.73 million tonnes. A major contributor to Malaysia’s CO2 emissions is coal-fired electricity power plants, responsible for 43.4% of the overall emissions. Malaysia’s forest soil offers organic sequestration of 15 tonnes of CO2 ha−1·year−1. Unlike organic CO2 sequestration in soil, inorganic sequestration of CO2 through mineral carbonation, once formed, is considered as a permanent sink. Inorganic CO2 sequestration in Malaysia has not been extensively studied, and the country’s potential for using the technique for atmospheric CO2 removal is undefined. In addition, Malaysia produces a significant amount of solid waste annually and, of that, demolition concrete waste, basalt quarry fine, and fly and bottom ashes are calcium-rich materials suitable for inorganic CO2 sequestration. This project introduces a potential solution for sequestering atmospheric CO2 inorganically for Malaysia. If lands associated to future developments in Malaysia are designed for inorganic CO2 sequestration using demolition concrete waste, basalt quarry fine, and fly and bottom ashes, 597,465 tonnes of CO2 can be captured annually adding a potential annual economic benefit of €4,700,000. View Full-Text
Keywords: CO2 emission; Malaysia; inorganic CO2 sequestration; demolition concrete waste; basalt quarry fine; fly and bottom ash CO2 emission; Malaysia; inorganic CO2 sequestration; demolition concrete waste; basalt quarry fine; fly and bottom ash
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Jorat, M.E.; Aziz, M.A.; Marto, A.; Zaini, N.; Jusoh, S.N.; Manning, D.A. Sequestering Atmospheric CO2 Inorganically: A Solution for Malaysia’s CO2 Emission. Geosciences 2018, 8, 483.

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