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Distribution and Transport of Thermal Energy within Magma–Hydrothermal Systems
Open AccessEditorial

Exploring and Modeling the Magma–Hydrothermal Regime

1
International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA
2
Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, FEB RAS, 683006 Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, Russia
3
Department of Earth Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Roma, Italy
4
Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Geomaterial and Energy Lab., Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579, Japan
5
Montanu Niversität Leoben, Erzherzog Johann-Straße 3, A-8700 Leoben, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Geosciences 2020, 10(6), 234; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10060234
Received: 16 June 2020 / Accepted: 16 June 2020 / Published: 18 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exploring and Modeling the Magma-Hydrothermal Regime)
This special issue comprises 12 papers from authors in 10 countries with new insights on the close coupling between magma as an energy and fluid source with hydrothermal systems as a primary control of magmatic behavior. Data and interpretation are provided on the rise of magma through a hydrothermal system, the relative timing of magmatic and hydrothermal events, the temporal evolution of supercritical aqueous fluids associated with ore formation, the magmatic and meteoric contributions of water to the systems, the big picture for the highly active Krafla Caldera, Iceland, as well as the implications of results from drilling at Krafla concerning the magma–hydrothermal boundary. Some of the more provocative concepts are that magma can intrude a hydrothermal system silently, that coplanar and coeval seismic events signal “magma fracking” beneath active volcanoes, that intrusive accumulations may far outlast volcanism, that arid climate favors formation of large magma chambers, and that even relatively dry rhyolite magma can convect rapidly and so lack a crystallizing mush roof. A shared theme is that hydrothermal and magmatic reservoirs need to be treated as a single system. View Full-Text
Keywords: magma–hydrothermal; geothermal energy; volcanology; magma convection; heat transport; gas and fluid geochemistry; phreatic eruption; volcano monitoring; geophysical imaging; drilling magma–hydrothermal; geothermal energy; volcanology; magma convection; heat transport; gas and fluid geochemistry; phreatic eruption; volcano monitoring; geophysical imaging; drilling
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Eichelberger, J.; Kiryukhin, A.; Mollo, S.; Tsuchiya, N.; Villeneuve, M. Exploring and Modeling the Magma–Hydrothermal Regime. Geosciences 2020, 10, 234.

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