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Article

Monitoring and Controlling House Mouse, Mus musculus domesticus, Infestations in Low-Income Multi-Family Dwellings

1
Department of Entomology, Rutgers—The State University of New Jersey, 96 Lipman Dr., New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
2
RMC Pest Management Consulting, LLC, Briarcliff Manor, NY 10510, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Mathew Crowther
Animals 2021, 11(3), 648; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11030648
Received: 28 January 2021 / Revised: 20 February 2021 / Accepted: 22 February 2021 / Published: 1 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Animal System and Management)
The house mouse is a very common pest in low-income multi-family residential dwellings. They cause significant property damage and produce allergens that are linked to asthma and allergy. Current mouse management practices in these dwellings are not effective. This study attempted to gain insights into residents’ impressions of house mice, develop more effective mouse detection methods, and evaluate the effectiveness of building-wide mouse management programs. The programs were implemented by researchers for 63 days and the results were monitored for up to 12 months. Significant differences were found in the efficacy of two commercial blank baits for detecting house mouse activity. Chocolate spread was significantly more effective than both commercial blank baits for detecting house mice. Between the two commercial toxic rodent baits tested, FirstStrike® (0.0025% difethialone) was more palatable than Contrac® (0.005% bromadiolone) rodent bait. A building-wide mouse control program resulted in an 87% reduction in mouse activity after three months in two buildings. After 12 months, the number of infestations decreased by 94% in one building, but increased by 26% in another building. Long-term house mouse control requires continuous efforts and the incorporation of multiple strategies.
The house mouse, Mus musculus domesticus, is a common pest in multi-family residential apartment buildings. This study was designed to gain insights into residents’ impressions of house mice, develop more effective house mouse detection methods, and evaluate the effectiveness of building-wide house mouse management programs. Two high-rise apartment buildings in New Jersey were selected for this study during 2019–2020. Bait stations with three different non-toxic baits were used to detect house mouse activity. Two rodenticides (FirstStrike®—0.0025% difethialone and Contrac®—0.005% bromadiolone) were applied by researchers over a 63-day period and pest control operations were then returned to pest control contractors for rodent management. There were significant differences in the consumption rates of non-toxic baits and two toxic baits tested. A novel non-toxic bait, chocolate spread, was much more sensitive than the two commercial non-toxic baits for detecting mouse activity. The house mouse management programs resulted in an average 87% reduction in the number of infested apartments after three months. At 12 months, the number of infestations decreased by 94% in one building, but increased by 26% in the second building. Sustainable control of house mouse infestations requires the use of effective monitoring strategies and control programs coupled with preventative measures. View Full-Text
Keywords: Mus musculus domesticus; spatial distribution; rodent management; monitoring Mus musculus domesticus; spatial distribution; rodent management; monitoring
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sked, S.; Abbar, S.; Cooper, R.; Corrigan, R.; Pan, X.; Ranabhat, S.; Wang, C. Monitoring and Controlling House Mouse, Mus musculus domesticus, Infestations in Low-Income Multi-Family Dwellings. Animals 2021, 11, 648. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11030648

AMA Style

Sked S, Abbar S, Cooper R, Corrigan R, Pan X, Ranabhat S, Wang C. Monitoring and Controlling House Mouse, Mus musculus domesticus, Infestations in Low-Income Multi-Family Dwellings. Animals. 2021; 11(3):648. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11030648

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sked, Shannon, Salehe Abbar, Richard Cooper, Robert Corrigan, Xiaodan Pan, Sabita Ranabhat, and Changlu Wang. 2021. "Monitoring and Controlling House Mouse, Mus musculus domesticus, Infestations in Low-Income Multi-Family Dwellings" Animals 11, no. 3: 648. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11030648

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