Next Article in Journal
Effect of Breed on the Level of the Nutritional and Health-Promoting Quality of Semimembranosus Muscle in Purebred and Crossbred Bulls
Next Article in Special Issue
Releasing Three Orphaned White Rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum) to the Game Reserve in South Africa. Rehabilitation, Translocation and Post-Release Observations
Previous Article in Journal
Zoonotic Viruses in Three Species of Voles from Poland
Previous Article in Special Issue
Diurnal Body Temperature and Rate of Passage of Loggers in Lions
Article

Current Societal Views about Sustainable Wildlife Management and Conservation: A Survey of College Students in China

1
College of Wildlife and Protected Area, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China
2
Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Environment, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130102, China
3
Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE), University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NR, UK
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2020, 10(10), 1821; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101821
Received: 12 August 2020 / Revised: 28 September 2020 / Accepted: 2 October 2020 / Published: 6 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent advance in Wildlife Conservation)
Wildlife conservation and management has become a very complex public policy issue in China as concerns about animal welfare and empathy for animals have emerged, especially in the younger generation. Science-based conservation policy and strategy that focus on sustainable management are perceived as less irrelevant today and can often be in conflict with emerging attitudes and values. Sustainable wildlife management adheres to the conservation concept of effective combination of species conservation and sustainable utilization, with an aim to establish a long-acting species conservation model that promotes all-round development of ecology, society, and economy, and has traditionally formed the basis of conservation management. This study designed a semi-structured questionnaire, which aimed to assess attitudes of Chinese college students towards sustainable wildlife management and wildlife conservation, and investigate the role of demographic and other characteristics on attitude. From October 2018 to April 2019, nine universities (including “Double First-Class” universities, first-tier universities, second-tier universities), and four three-year colleges in China were selected as survey sites, where face-to-face interviews were conducted among students. The results show that students broadly support the sustainable wildlife management but not in issues relating to “Animal Welfare and Rights” and “Trophy Hunting”. Students with lowest support for the theory and practice of sustainable wildlife management are vegetarians, freshmen, and those who have taken environmental protection electives in their educational program.
Wildlife conservation and management has become a very complex public policy issue in China as concerns over on animal welfare and empathy for animals have grown. Science-based conservation strategies that are oriented toward sustainable wildlife management (SWM) are under threat as these new attitudes and values emerge and take hold. This study accesses the attitudes of college students towards SWM and wildlife conservation, and investigates demographic characteristics influencing their attitudes in China, a country that is traditionally associated with consumptive use of wildlife and SWM, but where new ideas about wildlife conservation are emerging. From October 2018 to April 2019, nine universities (including “Double First-Class” universities, first-tier universities, second-tier universities), and four three-year colleges in China were selected as survey locations, and face-to-face interviews were conducted with 1991 students. A total of 1977 questionnaires were recovered, of which 1739 were valid, with a completion rate of 88%. A Likert seven-point scale method was used to score students’ attitudes, and a classification and regression tree (CART) was used to analyze whether their attitudes were affected by their demographic characteristics. The results show that although students are broadly supportive of the theory of SWM, some are deeply antagonistic about on SWM on issues that arouse strong emotions such as “Animal Welfare and Rights” and “Trophy Hunting”. Demographic characteristics of students affect their degree of support for the SWM with support for SWM lower among vegetarians, freshmen, and students who have taken environmental protection electives. This research suggests that the theory of SWM requires to be refreshed and adapted to appeal to the younger generation of Chinese students, with SWM principles integrated into the environmental education programs of universities and three-year colleges. More attention should also be attached to media publicity by the government about wildlife conservation so as to enhance awareness of the need for SWM. View Full-Text
Keywords: wildlife conservation; sustainable wildlife management; animal welfare and rights; attitude; China; college students wildlife conservation; sustainable wildlife management; animal welfare and rights; attitude; China; college students
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Miao, Z.; Wang, Q.; Chen, D.; Song, Z.; Zhang, W.; Zhou, X.; MacMillan, D.C. Current Societal Views about Sustainable Wildlife Management and Conservation: A Survey of College Students in China. Animals 2020, 10, 1821. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101821

AMA Style

Miao Z, Wang Q, Chen D, Song Z, Zhang W, Zhou X, MacMillan DC. Current Societal Views about Sustainable Wildlife Management and Conservation: A Survey of College Students in China. Animals. 2020; 10(10):1821. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101821

Chicago/Turabian Style

Miao, Zhen, Qiang Wang, Dongxiao Chen, Zhifan Song, Wei Zhang, Xuehong Zhou, and Douglas C. MacMillan 2020. "Current Societal Views about Sustainable Wildlife Management and Conservation: A Survey of College Students in China" Animals 10, no. 10: 1821. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101821

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop