Next Article in Journal
Appropriate Dairy Calf Feeding from Birth to Weaning: “It’s an Investment for the Future”
Previous Article in Journal
Can Enterocin M in Combination with Sage Extract Have Beneficial Effect on Microbiota, Blood Biochemistry, Phagocytic Activity and Jejunal Morphometry in Broiler Rabbits?
Open AccessTechnical Note

A New Approach for Accurate Detection of Chromosome Rearrangements That Affect Fertility in Cattle

School of Biosciences, University of Kent, Giles Lane, Canterbury CT2 7NJ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2020, 10(1), 114; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10010114
Received: 25 November 2019 / Revised: 8 January 2020 / Accepted: 8 January 2020 / Published: 10 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Animal Reproduction)
Globally, cattle production has more than doubled since the 1960s, with widespread use of artificial insemination (AI) and an emphasis on a small pool of high-genetic-merit animals. Selecting AI bulls with optimal fertility is therefore vital, as impaired fertility reduces genetic gains and reduces production, resulting in heavy financial and environmental losses. Chromosome translocations, where large parts of the genome are inappropriately attached in abnormal patterns, are a common cause of reduced fertility; however, reciprocal translocations are significantly underreported due to the difficulties inherent in analysing cattle chromosomes. Based on our previous work, we have developed an approach for the unambiguous detection of abnormalities that affect fertility. We applied this method on the chromosomes of 39 bulls, detecting multiple abnormalities that affect fertility, including those that would be undetectable using traditional screening techniques. With UK dairy calving rates of only 50–60%, it is vital to reduce further fertility loss in order to maximise productivity. The approach developed here identifies abnormalities that DNA sequencing will not, and has the potential to lead to long-term gains, delivering meat and milk products in a more cost-effective and environmentally-responsible manner to a growing population.
Globally, cattle production has more than doubled since the 1960s, with widespread use of artificial insemination (AI) and an emphasis on a small pool of high genetic merit animals. Selecting AI bulls with optimal fertility is, therefore, vital, as impaired fertility reduces genetic gains and production, resulting in heavy financial and environmental losses. Chromosome translocations, particularly the 1;29 Robertsonian translocation, are a common cause of reduced fertility; however, reciprocal translocations are significantly underreported due to the difficulties inherent in analysing cattle chromosomes. Based on our porcine work, we have developed an approach for the unambiguous detection of Robertsonian and reciprocal translocations, using a multiple-hybridization probe detection strategy. We applied this method on the chromosomes of 39 bulls, detecting heterozygous and homozygous 1;29 translocations and a 12;23 reciprocal translocation in a total of seven animals. Previously, karyotype analysis was the only method of diagnosing chromosomal rearrangements in cattle, and was time-consuming and error-prone. With calving rates of only 50–60%, it is vital to reduce further fertility loss in order to maximise productivity. The approach developed here identifies abnormalities that DNA sequencing will not, and has the potential to lead to long-term gains, delivering meat and milk products in a more cost-effective and environmentally-responsible manner to a growing population. View Full-Text
Keywords: cattle; translocation; FISH; artificial insemination; subfertility; chromosome; genetics cattle; translocation; FISH; artificial insemination; subfertility; chromosome; genetics
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Jennings, R.L.; Griffin, D.K.; O’Connor, R.E. A New Approach for Accurate Detection of Chromosome Rearrangements That Affect Fertility in Cattle. Animals 2020, 10, 114.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop