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Article

Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Outbreaks in the United States, 2010–2017

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current affiliation: Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz, Aurora, CO 80045, USA.
Academic Editor: Azucena Mora
Microorganisms 2021, 9(7), 1529; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9071529
Received: 26 June 2021 / Revised: 9 July 2021 / Accepted: 13 July 2021 / Published: 17 July 2021
Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause illnesses ranging from mild diarrhea to ischemic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS); serogroup O157 is the most common cause. We describe the epidemiology and transmission routes for U.S. STEC outbreaks during 2010–2017. Health departments reported 466 STEC outbreaks affecting 4769 persons; 459 outbreaks had a serogroup identified (330 O157, 124 non-O157, 5 both). Among these, 361 (77%) had a known transmission route: 200 foodborne (44% of O157 outbreaks, 41% of non-O157 outbreaks), 87 person-to-person (16%, 24%), 49 animal contact (11%, 9%), 20 water (4%, 5%), and 5 environmental contamination (2%, 0%). The most common food category implicated was vegetable row crops. The distribution of O157 and non-O157 outbreaks varied by age, sex, and severity. A significantly higher percentage of STEC O157 than non-O157 outbreaks were transmitted by beef (p = 0.02). STEC O157 outbreaks also had significantly higher rates of hospitalization and HUS (p < 0.001). View Full-Text
Keywords: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC); O157; non-O157; foodborne; outbreaks; epidemiology Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC); O157; non-O157; foodborne; outbreaks; epidemiology
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tack, D.M.; Kisselburgh, H.M.; Richardson, L.C.; Geissler, A.; Griffin, P.M.; Payne, D.C.; Gleason, B.L. Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Outbreaks in the United States, 2010–2017. Microorganisms 2021, 9, 1529. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9071529

AMA Style

Tack DM, Kisselburgh HM, Richardson LC, Geissler A, Griffin PM, Payne DC, Gleason BL. Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Outbreaks in the United States, 2010–2017. Microorganisms. 2021; 9(7):1529. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9071529

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tack, Danielle M., Hannah M. Kisselburgh, LaTonia C. Richardson, Aimee Geissler, Patricia M. Griffin, Daniel C. Payne, and Brigette L. Gleason 2021. "Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Outbreaks in the United States, 2010–2017" Microorganisms 9, no. 7: 1529. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9071529

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