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Article

Borrelia burgdorferi Migration Assays for Evaluation of Chemoattractants in Tick Saliva

1
Division of Immunology, Tulane National Primate Research Center, Tulane University Health Sciences, Covington, LA 70433, USA
2
Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70802, USA
3
Division of Veterinary Medicine, Tulane National Primate Research Center, Tulane University Health Sciences, Covington, LA 70433, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Alejandro Cabezas-Cruz, Ladislav Šimo, James J. Valdés and Dasiel Obregón
Pathogens 2022, 11(5), 530; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11050530
Received: 5 April 2022 / Revised: 27 April 2022 / Accepted: 29 April 2022 / Published: 1 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Collection New Frontiers in Tick Research)
Uptake of the Lyme disease spirochete by its tick vector requires not only chemical signals present in the tick’s saliva but a responsive phenotype by the Borrelia burgdorferi living in the mammalian host. This is the principle behind xenodiagnosis, wherein pathogen is detected by vector acquisition. To study migration of B. burgdorferi toward Ixodes scapularis tick saliva, with the goal of identifying chemoattractant molecules, we tested multiple assays and compared migration of host-adapted spirochetes to those cultured in vitro. We tested mammalian host-adapted spirochetes, along with those grown in culture at 34 °C, for their relative attraction to tick saliva or the nutrient N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (D-GlcNAc) and its dimer chitobiose using two different experimental designs. The host-adapted B. burgdorferi showed greater preference for tick saliva over the nutrients, whereas the cultured incubator-grown B. burgdorferi displayed no significant attraction to saliva versus a significant response to the nutrients. Our results not only describe a validated migration assay for studies of the Lyme disease agent, but provide a further understanding of how growth conditions and phenotype of B. burgdorferi are related to vector acquisition. View Full-Text
Keywords: Borrelia burgdorferi; Ixodes tick; saliva; vector; migration; chemoattractant Borrelia burgdorferi; Ixodes tick; saliva; vector; migration; chemoattractant
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jacobs, M.B.; Grasperge, B.J.; Doyle-Meyers, L.A.; Embers, M.E. Borrelia burgdorferi Migration Assays for Evaluation of Chemoattractants in Tick Saliva. Pathogens 2022, 11, 530. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11050530

AMA Style

Jacobs MB, Grasperge BJ, Doyle-Meyers LA, Embers ME. Borrelia burgdorferi Migration Assays for Evaluation of Chemoattractants in Tick Saliva. Pathogens. 2022; 11(5):530. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11050530

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jacobs, Mary B., Britton J. Grasperge, Lara A. Doyle-Meyers, and Monica E. Embers. 2022. "Borrelia burgdorferi Migration Assays for Evaluation of Chemoattractants in Tick Saliva" Pathogens 11, no. 5: 530. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11050530

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