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Article

Association of Fungi and Archaea of the Gut Microbiota with Crohn’s Disease in Pediatric Patients—Pilot Study

1
Department of Molecular Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 31-121 Krakow, Poland
2
Department of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 30-663 Krakow, Poland
3
Microbiology Department, Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, 85-094 Bydgoszcz, Poland
4
Clinical Microbiology Laboratory, University Hospital No. 1 in Bydgoszcz, 85-094 Bydgoszcz, Poland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ana Elena Pérez Cobas
Pathogens 2021, 10(9), 1119; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10091119
Received: 4 August 2021 / Revised: 29 August 2021 / Accepted: 29 August 2021 / Published: 1 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Status of Research on Gut Metabolites and Gut Microbiota)
The composition of bacteria is often altered in Crohn’s disease (CD), but its connection to the disease is not fully understood. Gut archaea and fungi have recently been suggested to play a role as well. In our study, the presence and number of selected species of fungi and archaea in pediatric patients with CD and healthy controls were evaluated. Stool samples were collected from children with active CD (n = 54), non-active CD (n = 37) and control subjects (n = 33). The prevalence and the number of selected microorganisms were assessed by real-time PCR. The prevalence of Candida tropicalis was significantly increased in active CD compared to non-active CD and the control group (p = 0.011 and p = 0.036, respectively). The number of Malassezia spp. cells was significantly lower in patients with active CD compared to the control group, but in non-active CD, a significant increase was observed (p = 0.005 and p = 0.020, respectively). There were no statistically significant differences in the colonization by archaea. The obtained results indicate possible correlations with the course of the CD; however, further studies of the entire archeobiome and the mycobiome are necessary in order to receive a complete picture. View Full-Text
Keywords: fungi; archaea; gut microbiota; Crohn’s disease; gut dysbiosis fungi; archaea; gut microbiota; Crohn’s disease; gut dysbiosis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Krawczyk, A.; Salamon, D.; Kowalska-Duplaga, K.; Bogiel, T.; Gosiewski, T. Association of Fungi and Archaea of the Gut Microbiota with Crohn’s Disease in Pediatric Patients—Pilot Study. Pathogens 2021, 10, 1119. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10091119

AMA Style

Krawczyk A, Salamon D, Kowalska-Duplaga K, Bogiel T, Gosiewski T. Association of Fungi and Archaea of the Gut Microbiota with Crohn’s Disease in Pediatric Patients—Pilot Study. Pathogens. 2021; 10(9):1119. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10091119

Chicago/Turabian Style

Krawczyk, Agnieszka, Dominika Salamon, Kinga Kowalska-Duplaga, Tomasz Bogiel, and Tomasz Gosiewski. 2021. "Association of Fungi and Archaea of the Gut Microbiota with Crohn’s Disease in Pediatric Patients—Pilot Study" Pathogens 10, no. 9: 1119. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10091119

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