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Article

Half-Remembering and Half-Forgetting? On Turning the Past of Old Norse Studies into a Future of Old Norse Studies

Faculty of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies, School of Humanities, University of Iceland, 102 Reykjavík, Iceland
Humanities 2020, 9(3), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/h9030097
Received: 16 July 2020 / Revised: 25 August 2020 / Accepted: 27 August 2020 / Published: 28 August 2020
Many Humanities scholars seem to have become increasingly pessimistic due to a lack of success in their efforts to be recognized as a serious player next to their science, technology, engineering, and maths (STEM) colleagues. This appears to be the result of a profound uncertainty in the self-perception of individual disciplines within the Humanities regarding their role both in academia and society. This ambiguity, not least, has its roots in their own history, which often appears as an interwoven texture of conflicting opinions. Taking a stance on the current and future role of the Humanities in general, and individual disciplines in particular thus asks for increased engagement with their own past, i.e., histories of scholarship, which are contingent on societal and political contexts. This article’s focus is on a case study from the field of Old Norse Studies. In the face of the rise of populism and nationalism in our days, Old Norse Studies, with their focus on a ‘Germanic’ past, have a special obligation to address societal challenges. The article argues for the public engagement with the histories of individual disciplines to strengthen scholarly credibility in the face of public opinion and to overcome trenches which hamper attempts at uniting Humanities experts and regaining distinct social relevance. View Full-Text
Keywords: Medieval Studies; Old Norse; medievalism; nationalism; populism; history of scholarship; STEAM; academia and society; public scholarship; expert opinion Medieval Studies; Old Norse; medievalism; nationalism; populism; history of scholarship; STEAM; academia and society; public scholarship; expert opinion
MDPI and ACS Style

van Nahl, J.A. Half-Remembering and Half-Forgetting? On Turning the Past of Old Norse Studies into a Future of Old Norse Studies. Humanities 2020, 9, 97. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9030097

AMA Style

van Nahl JA. Half-Remembering and Half-Forgetting? On Turning the Past of Old Norse Studies into a Future of Old Norse Studies. Humanities. 2020; 9(3):97. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9030097

Chicago/Turabian Style

van Nahl, Jan A. 2020. "Half-Remembering and Half-Forgetting? On Turning the Past of Old Norse Studies into a Future of Old Norse Studies" Humanities 9, no. 3: 97. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9030097

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