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The Great Displacement: Reading Migration Fiction at the End of the World

INCAL (Institut des civilisations, arts et lettres), ECR (Centre de recherche écriture, création, représentation), Faculté de Philosophie, Arts et Lettres, UCLouvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
Humanities 2020, 9(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/h9010025
Received: 14 October 2019 / Revised: 9 February 2020 / Accepted: 3 March 2020 / Published: 9 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Humanities Approaches to Climate Change)
This paper examines how contemporary works of fiction and nonfiction reflect on anticipated cases of climate dislocation. Building on existing research about migrant agency, climate fiction, and human rights, it traces the contours of climate migration discourse before analyzing how three twenty-first-century novels enable us to reimagine the “great displacement” beyond simplistic militarized and humanitarian frames. Zooming in on stories by Mohsin Hamid, John Lanchester, and Margaret Drabble that envision hypothetical calamities while responding to present-day refugee “crises”, this paper explains how these texts interrogate apocalyptic narratives by demilitarizing borderscapes, exploring survivalist mindsets, and interrogating shallow appeals to empathy. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; migration; contemporary literature; empathy; Mohsin Hamid; John Lanchester; Margaret Drabble; Amitav Ghosh climate change; migration; contemporary literature; empathy; Mohsin Hamid; John Lanchester; Margaret Drabble; Amitav Ghosh
MDPI and ACS Style

De Bruyn, B. The Great Displacement: Reading Migration Fiction at the End of the World. Humanities 2020, 9, 25. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9010025

AMA Style

De Bruyn B. The Great Displacement: Reading Migration Fiction at the End of the World. Humanities. 2020; 9(1):25. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9010025

Chicago/Turabian Style

De Bruyn, Ben. 2020. "The Great Displacement: Reading Migration Fiction at the End of the World" Humanities 9, no. 1: 25. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9010025

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