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Humanities 2019, 8(1), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/h8010036

From Wounded Knee to Sacred Circles: Oglala Lakota Ethos as “Haunt” and “Wound”

Department of Language and Literature, Texas A&M University, Kingsville, TX 78363, USA
Received: 24 January 2019 / Revised: 6 February 2019 / Accepted: 14 February 2019 / Published: 25 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Histories of Ethos: World Perspectives on Rhetoric)
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Abstract

Oglala Lakota ethos manifests a pre-Socratic/Heideggerian variant of ethos: ethos as “haunt”. Within this alternative to the Aristotelian ethos-as-character, Oglala ethos marks out the “dwelling place” of the Oglala Lakota people. That is, the Oglala Lakota ground their cultural- and self-identity in the land: their ethology, in effect, expresses an ecology. Thus, an Oglala Lakotan ethos cannot be understood apart from its nation’s understanding of the natural world—of its primacy and sacredness. A further aspect of the Oglala Lakotan ethos rests in the nation’s history of conflict with EuroAmericans. Through military conflict, forced displacement, and material/economic exploitation of reservation lands, an Oglala Lakota ethos bears within itself a woundedness that continues to this day. Only through an understanding of ethos-as-haunt, of cultural trauma or woundedness, and of the ways of healing can Oglala Lakota ethos be fully appreciated. View Full-Text
Keywords: Oglala Lakota; ethos; haunt; wound; ecology; ecological; Wounded Knee; American Indian; cultural wound Oglala Lakota; ethos; haunt; wound; ecology; ecological; Wounded Knee; American Indian; cultural wound
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Meyer, C.A. From Wounded Knee to Sacred Circles: Oglala Lakota Ethos as “Haunt” and “Wound”. Humanities 2019, 8, 36.

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