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Humanities 2018, 7(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/h7010012

Iconography for the Age of Social Media

Postgraduate Arts and Humanities Centre, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M15 6BG, UK
Received: 6 December 2017 / Revised: 10 January 2018 / Accepted: 24 January 2018 / Published: 26 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pictures and Conflicts since 1945)
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Abstract

An iconic photograph of Ieshia Evans’ arrest at a Black Lives Matter protest went viral on Twitter. Twitter users’ textual and visual responses to it appear to show recurring patterns in the ways users interpret photographs. Aby Warburg recognized a similar process in the history of art, referring to the afterlife of images. Evaluating these responses with an updated form of iconography sheds light upon this tangled afterlife across multiple media. Users’ response patterns suggest new ways to develop iconological interpretations, offering clues to a systematic use of iconography as a methodology for social media research. View Full-Text
Keywords: Black Lives Matter; confrontation; iconography; iconology; Ieshia Evans; interpretation; Panofsky; photography; protest; social media; Twitter; Warburg Black Lives Matter; confrontation; iconography; iconology; Ieshia Evans; interpretation; Panofsky; photography; protest; social media; Twitter; Warburg
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Drainville, R. Iconography for the Age of Social Media. Humanities 2018, 7, 12.

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