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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

One Voice Too Many: Echoes of Irony and Trauma in Oedipus the King

Department of English, University of Tampa, Tampa, FL 33606, USA
Academic Editor: Gail Finney
Humanities 2017, 6(4), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/h6040086
Received: 30 September 2017 / Revised: 1 November 2017 / Accepted: 3 November 2017 / Published: 9 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wounded: Studies in Literary and Cinematic Trauma)
Sophocles’ Oedipus the King has often inspired concurrent interpretations examining the tragic irony of the play and the traumatic neurosis of its protagonist. The Theban king epitomizes a man who knows everything but himself, and Sophocles’ use of irony allows Oedipus to discover the truth in a manner that Freud viewed in The Interpretation of Dreams as “comparable to the work of a psychoanalysis.” Psychoanalytical readings of Oedipus at times depend greatly on his role as a doubled figure, but this article specifically investigates his doubled voice in order to demonstrate the interrelated, chiasmic relationship between Oedipus’ trauma and the trope of irony. It argues, in fact, that irony serves as the language, so to speak, of the traumatic experiences haunting the king and his city, but it also posits that this doubled voice compounds the irony of the play and its hero. In other words, in addition to the Sophoclean irony that dominates the work, the doubling of the king’s voice reveals a modified form of Socratic irony that contributes to the tragedy’s power. Consequently, even after the king’s recognition of the truth ultimately resolves the work’s tragic irony, Oedipus remains divided by a state of simultaneous knowledge and ignorance. View Full-Text
Keywords: Oedipus; trauma; neurosis; irony; voice; doubled; echo; knowledge; ignorance Oedipus; trauma; neurosis; irony; voice; doubled; echo; knowledge; ignorance
MDPI and ACS Style

Waggoner, J. One Voice Too Many: Echoes of Irony and Trauma in Oedipus the King. Humanities 2017, 6, 86. https://doi.org/10.3390/h6040086

AMA Style

Waggoner J. One Voice Too Many: Echoes of Irony and Trauma in Oedipus the King. Humanities. 2017; 6(4):86. https://doi.org/10.3390/h6040086

Chicago/Turabian Style

Waggoner, Joshua. 2017. "One Voice Too Many: Echoes of Irony and Trauma in Oedipus the King" Humanities 6, no. 4: 86. https://doi.org/10.3390/h6040086

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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