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Humanities 2017, 6(3), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/h6030074

Insects and the Kafkaesque: Insectuous Re-Writings in Visual and Audio-Visual Media

German Language and Literature Program, School of Arts and Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
Received: 16 June 2017 / Revised: 8 September 2017 / Accepted: 13 September 2017 / Published: 16 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Narratology)
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Abstract

In this article, I examine techniques at work in visual and audio-visual media that deal with the creative imitation of central Kafkan themes, particularly those related to hybrid insects and bodily deformity. In addition, the opening section of my study offers a detailed and thorough discussion of the concept of the “Kafkaesque”, and an attempt will be made to circumscribe its signifying limits. The main objective of the study is to explore the relationship between Kafka’s texts and the works of contemporary cartoonists, illustrators (Charles Burns), and filmmakers (David Cronenberg) and identify themes and motifs that they have in common. My approach is informed by transtextual practices and source studies, and I draw systematically on Gerard Genette’s Palimpsests and Harold Bloom’s The Anxiety of Influence. View Full-Text
Keywords: Kafka studies; adaptation studies; narratology; intertextuality; intermediality; mimesis; emulation; imitation; repetition; parody Kafka studies; adaptation studies; narratology; intertextuality; intermediality; mimesis; emulation; imitation; repetition; parody
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Grammatikopoulos, D. Insects and the Kafkaesque: Insectuous Re-Writings in Visual and Audio-Visual Media. Humanities 2017, 6, 74.

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