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Article

Looking at Animals without Seeing Them: Havelock Ellis in the “Circe” Episode of Ulysses

Centre for Manuscript Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp 2000, Belgium
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/h6030073
Received: 28 July 2017 / Revised: 1 September 2017 / Accepted: 5 September 2017 / Published: 8 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joyce, Animals and the Nonhuman)
Taking wing from Joyce’s reading of Havelock Ellis’s Studies in the Psychology of Sex, in which the Irish writer found an account of cross-species sexual contact, this essay explores Leopold Bloom’s animal metamorphosis in the “Circe” episode of Ulysses. It argues that this encounter with the nonhuman animal is subordinated to the cause of working through barriers of human difference. In the process, the animal that enables this reconciliation disappears. Unable to represent animal interiority, “Circe” settles for merely probing their interiors. View Full-Text
Keywords: James Joyce; Ulysses; Havelock Ellis; Irish studies; animal studies; genetic criticism; sexuality James Joyce; Ulysses; Havelock Ellis; Irish studies; animal studies; genetic criticism; sexuality
MDPI and ACS Style

Crowley, R. Looking at Animals without Seeing Them: Havelock Ellis in the “Circe” Episode of Ulysses. Humanities 2017, 6, 73. https://doi.org/10.3390/h6030073

AMA Style

Crowley R. Looking at Animals without Seeing Them: Havelock Ellis in the “Circe” Episode of Ulysses. Humanities. 2017; 6(3):73. https://doi.org/10.3390/h6030073

Chicago/Turabian Style

Crowley, Ronan. 2017. "Looking at Animals without Seeing Them: Havelock Ellis in the “Circe” Episode of Ulysses" Humanities 6, no. 3: 73. https://doi.org/10.3390/h6030073

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