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Petromyopia: Oil and the Energy Humanities

School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies, Arizona State University, PO Box 874302 Tempe, AZ 85287-4302, USA
Academic Editor: Adam W. Sweeting
Humanities 2016, 5(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/h5020036
Received: 18 January 2016 / Revised: 8 March 2016 / Accepted: 28 March 2016 / Published: 3 June 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Use and the Humanities)
Oil is currently over-represented in the energy humanities, a state of affairs I describe as petromyopia. While oil constitutes a vital source of energy in the modern world, focusing too heavily on petroleum can distract scholars from giving proper attention to other aspects of the social and cultural dimensions of energy. The goal of this article is to encourage those in the energy humanities to cast a broader net in their analyses and recognize the full diversity of energy systems in their scholarship. View Full-Text
Keywords: energy humanities; oil; petroleum; coal; natural gas; solar; wind; renewable; energy energy humanities; oil; petroleum; coal; natural gas; solar; wind; renewable; energy
MDPI and ACS Style

Jones, C.F. Petromyopia: Oil and the Energy Humanities. Humanities 2016, 5, 36. https://doi.org/10.3390/h5020036

AMA Style

Jones CF. Petromyopia: Oil and the Energy Humanities. Humanities. 2016; 5(2):36. https://doi.org/10.3390/h5020036

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jones, Christopher F. 2016. "Petromyopia: Oil and the Energy Humanities" Humanities 5, no. 2: 36. https://doi.org/10.3390/h5020036

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