Next Article in Journal
‘Sis Science’ and Fitness Doping: Ethnopharmacology, Gender and Risk
Next Article in Special Issue
Kenya’s Over-Reliance on Institutionalization as a Child Care and Child Protection Model: A Root-Cause Approach
Previous Article in Journal
Big Data in Education: Perception of Training Advisors on Its Use in the Educational System
Previous Article in Special Issue
The TACL Model: A Framework for Safeguarding Children with a Disability in Sport
Open AccessArticle

‘Warm Eyes’, ‘Warm Breath’, ‘Heart Warmth’: Using Aroha (Love) and Warmth to Reconceptualise and Work towards Best Interests in Child Protection

1
Social Work and Social Policy, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
2
College of Community Development and Personal Wellbeing, The Otago Polytechnic, Dunedin 9016, New Zealand
3
Faculty of Social Sciences, The University of Stavanger, Faculty of Social Sciences, 4036 Stavanger, Norway
4
Gender Studies and Criminology, The University of Otago, Sociology, Dunedin 9016, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Soc. Sci. 2020, 9(4), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9040054
Received: 11 March 2020 / Revised: 13 April 2020 / Accepted: 13 April 2020 / Published: 17 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Debates and Developments in Child Protection)
The attributes ‘warm eyes’, ‘breathe warm air’, ‘heart warmth’ and aroha (love) guide our work in child protection. These quotes are from a young person from the Change Factory 2020, a MFAMILY student in 2020 and Jan Erik Henricksen Key Note at the 4th International Indigenous Voices in Social Work Conference, Alta, Norway 2017 respectively, to describe the way young people and families want workers to be. We reflect on the child rights and family inclusion provisions of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRoC), and the Aotearoa New Zealand (ANZ) legislation Children, Young Persons and their Families Act (1989), in contributing to the best interests of the child. We examine current events in our locations, Aotearoa New Zealand, Norway and Western Australia, as demonstrating that these joint principles are far from universally used in child protection practice. The sole use of Article 3 of the UNCRoC, in particular, often results in excluding families as legitimate stakeholders. In seeking to achieve the best interests of the child, we apply a practice framework to example vignettes. Here, we have added micro-practices to address the identified gaps in relationship building, engagement and enabling practices in working towards the practice of best interests. View Full-Text
Keywords: child rights; family inclusion; child protection; co-constructing social work; practice frameworks; young people and children child rights; family inclusion; child protection; co-constructing social work; practice frameworks; young people and children
MDPI and ACS Style

Young, S.; McKenzie, M.; Omre, C.; Schjelderup, L.; Walker, S. ‘Warm Eyes’, ‘Warm Breath’, ‘Heart Warmth’: Using Aroha (Love) and Warmth to Reconceptualise and Work towards Best Interests in Child Protection. Soc. Sci. 2020, 9, 54.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop