Next Article in Journal
The TACL Model: A Framework for Safeguarding Children with a Disability in Sport
Previous Article in Journal
Minority Stress and Mental Health in Italian Bisexual People
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Can Social Networks Make Us More Sensitive to Social Discrimination? E-Contact, Identity Processes and Perception of Online Sexual Discrimination in a Sample of Facebook Users

Department of Humanities, Social Sciences and Cultural Industries, University of Parma, 43121 Parma, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Soc. Sci. 2020, 9(4), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9040047
Received: 19 March 2020 / Revised: 6 April 2020 / Accepted: 7 April 2020 / Published: 9 April 2020
In recent years psychosocial studies have given a growing attention to online intergroup contact in reducing prejudice. Nevertheless, there is still a lack of evidence on processes that could mediate this relation. The present study aimed to fill this gap. Focused on intergroup relationships between people with different sexual orientations, it examined whether and to what extent identity processes—i.e., sexual identity commitment and exploration—mediated the relationship between online intergroup contact and perception of mediated and vicarious sexual online discrimination on Facebook. Data was collected with a sample of 357 Facebook users (Mage = 26.07, SD = 8.37; females: 64.9%, males: 35.1%) who completed an online questionnaire. A full Structural Equation Modeling was tested. Results showed that: (a) Online contact was positively associated with perceived online sexual discrimination; (b) online contact was positively associated with identity exploration but not commitment; (c) exploration—but not commitment—was positively associated with perceived online sexual discrimination; (d) sexual identity exploration—but not commitment—mediated the relationship between online contact and perception of sexual discrimination, increasing the positive effect of contact on perceived discrimination. Limitations and directions for future research were discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: e-contact; sexual identity; online sexual discrimination; Facebook e-contact; sexual identity; online sexual discrimination; Facebook
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Mancini, T.; Imperato, C. Can Social Networks Make Us More Sensitive to Social Discrimination? E-Contact, Identity Processes and Perception of Online Sexual Discrimination in a Sample of Facebook Users. Soc. Sci. 2020, 9, 47.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop