Next Article in Journal
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Social Sciences in 2017
Previous Article in Journal
Modeling and Evaluation of the Possibilities of Forming a Regional Industrial Symbiosis Networks
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7010014

Uncovering Discursive Framings of the Bangladesh Shipbreaking Industry

1
CREIDD Research Center on Environmental Studies & Sustainability, Department of Humanities, Environment & Information Technology, Institut Charles Delaunay, CNRS-UMR 6281, University of Technology of Troyes, 10300 Troyes, France
2
Department of Social Sciences, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr., Houghton, MI 49931, USA
3
School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr., Houghton, MI 49931, USA
4
Department of Native Environmental Science, Northwest Indian College, Bellingham, WA 98229, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 November 2017 / Revised: 4 January 2018 / Accepted: 17 January 2018 / Published: 19 January 2018
Full-Text   |   PDF [1244 KB, uploaded 19 January 2018]   |  

Abstract

Shipbreaking in the Chittagong region of Bangladesh supplies metal to meet the needs of the nation’s construction sector. The shipbreaking industry has received international attention for environmental contamination and workers’ insecurity. However, these issues have been framed without considering the actors that produce them and their associated motives. This paper illuminates the conflicting discourses regarding the industry between two divergent groups of actors. On the one hand, national and international NGOs collaborate to enforce a discourse focused on negative localized impacts. On the other hand, yard owners, yard workers, and local community members forge a counter discourse, focused on positive localized impacts and raising doubts about the origin of the environmental pollutants and occupational standards setting. National and international actors have so far missed the conflicting perspective of workers, yard owners, locals and NGOs. We contend that these divergent discourses involve scalar politics, with one discursive frame focused on localized impacts in order to leverage global resources, while the other situates local communities in the global world system; this confounding of scale leads to ineffective policy formulation. This shipbreaking case study provides a valuable lesson on the importance of listening to and including stakeholders at multiple scales when seeking policies to address localized impacts of a globalized industry. View Full-Text
Keywords: discourse; framing; politics of scale; shipbreaking; shiprecycling; environmental contamination; working condition discourse; framing; politics of scale; shipbreaking; shiprecycling; environmental contamination; working condition
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Rahman, S.M.M.; Schelly, C.; Mayer, A.L.; Norman, E.S. Uncovering Discursive Framings of the Bangladesh Shipbreaking Industry. Soc. Sci. 2018, 7, 14.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Soc. Sci. EISSN 2076-0760 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top