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Article

Adaptation of an Evidence-Based Online Depression Prevention Intervention for College Students: Intervention Development and Pilot Study Results

1
Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA 02481, USA
2
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Barbara Fawcett
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(10), 398; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10100398
Received: 1 September 2021 / Revised: 29 September 2021 / Accepted: 13 October 2021 / Published: 16 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technological Approaches for the Treatment of Mental Health in Youth)
College and university students across the United States are experiencing increases in depressive symptoms and risk for clinical depression. As college counseling centers strive to address the problem through wellness outreach and psychoeducation, limited resources make it difficult to reach students who would most benefit. Technology-based prevention programs have the potential to increase reach and address barriers to access encountered by students in need of mental health support. Part 1 of this manuscript describes the development of the Willow intervention, an adaptation of the technology-based CATCH-IT depression prevention intervention using a community participatory approach, for use by students at a women’s liberal arts college. Part 2 presents data from a pilot study of Willow with N = 34 (mean age = 19.82, SD = 1.19) students. Twenty-nine participants (85%) logged onto Willow at least once, and eight (24%) completed the full intervention. Participants positively rated the acceptability, appropriateness, and feasibility of Willow. After eight weeks of use, results suggested decreases in depressive symptoms (95% CI (0.46–3.59)), anxiety symptoms (95% CI (0.41–3.04)), and rumination (95% CI (0.45–8.18)). This internet-based prevention intervention was found to be acceptable, feasible to implement, and may be associated with decreased internalizing symptoms. View Full-Text
Keywords: depression prevention; college students; technology-based intervention; intervention adaptation depression prevention; college students; technology-based intervention; intervention adaptation
MDPI and ACS Style

Gladstone, T.R.G.; Rintell, L.S.; Buchholz, K.R.; Myers, T.L. Adaptation of an Evidence-Based Online Depression Prevention Intervention for College Students: Intervention Development and Pilot Study Results. Soc. Sci. 2021, 10, 398. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10100398

AMA Style

Gladstone TRG, Rintell LS, Buchholz KR, Myers TL. Adaptation of an Evidence-Based Online Depression Prevention Intervention for College Students: Intervention Development and Pilot Study Results. Social Sciences. 2021; 10(10):398. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10100398

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gladstone, Tracy R.G., L. S. Rintell, Katherine R. Buchholz, and Taylor L. Myers. 2021. "Adaptation of an Evidence-Based Online Depression Prevention Intervention for College Students: Intervention Development and Pilot Study Results" Social Sciences 10, no. 10: 398. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10100398

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