Next Article in Journal
Governing Migration through COVID-19? Dutch Political and Media Discourse in Times of a Pandemic
Next Article in Special Issue
Dogs as Therapeutic Partners, Not Therapeutic Tools: Ethical Considerations for AAT in the Correctional Setting
Previous Article in Journal
Understanding and Supporting the Confucian Heritage Culture International Students in Victorian Independent Schools: A Perspective of School Leaders
Previous Article in Special Issue
Humane Education’s Effect on Middle School Student Motivation and Standards-Based Reading Assessment
 
 
Article

Using the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) to Study Animal Cruelty: Preliminary Results (2016–2019)

Pro Bono Consultant, Animal Welfare Institute, Washington, DC 20003, USA
Academic Editors: Kimberly Spanjol, Cathryn Lavery and Heath Grant
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(10), 378; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10100378
Received: 10 August 2021 / Revised: 1 October 2021 / Accepted: 2 October 2021 / Published: 11 October 2021
On 1 January 2016, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) began collecting data on crimes involving animal cruelty from law enforcement agencies that participate in the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) in the United States (U.S.). Prior to 2016, such crimes either went unreported or were lumped into an “all other offenses” category, making it difficult to understand who was committing these crimes and whether there were any connections between crimes perpetrated against animals and crimes in which there was a human victim. Animal cruelty has cruelty has been linked to certain types of human violence and, therefore, it is important for authorities to know more about the people committing these crimes. Preliminary results from an analysis of the first four years (2016–2019) of data are presented. The age and gender of animal cruelty offenders, the time of day when most crimes occur, and the most common locations where offenses take place are presented. The type of animal cruelty involved and details of the other crimes that co-occur with animal cruelty are discussed. The limitations of the data are shared and recommendations are made about other types of data that could be collected in the future to add value to the data. View Full-Text
Keywords: animal cruelty; criminal justice; domestic violence; crime data; child maltreatment animal cruelty; criminal justice; domestic violence; crime data; child maltreatment
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Palais, J.M. Using the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) to Study Animal Cruelty: Preliminary Results (2016–2019). Soc. Sci. 2021, 10, 378. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10100378

AMA Style

Palais JM. Using the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) to Study Animal Cruelty: Preliminary Results (2016–2019). Social Sciences. 2021; 10(10):378. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10100378

Chicago/Turabian Style

Palais, Julie M. 2021. "Using the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) to Study Animal Cruelty: Preliminary Results (2016–2019)" Social Sciences 10, no. 10: 378. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10100378

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop