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Open AccessArticle

Neglect and the Kaleidoscopic Mind: Psychology and Mental Health in Contemporary Art

1
Independent Artist, Los Angeles, CA 90065, USA
2
Brain and Creativity Institute, University of Southern California, 3620A McClintock Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 January 2020 / Revised: 22 February 2020 / Accepted: 26 March 2020 / Published: 8 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology and Mental Health in Contemporary Art)
This paper seeks to explore the broad question of whether and how art can be applied to medical therapeutic practices. As part of this research, the paper outlines an ongoing project, exemplifying this combined approach, which seeks to improve function in stroke patients. We reviewed previous collaborations between art and psychology dating back to the 1960s, employing methods ranging from simple, analog, haptic interfaces to the contemporary potential of machine learning to improve brain function. We then outline an ongoing project employing machine learning and multisensory stimulation to improve function in stroke patients, which are being run in collaboration with Klinik Lippoldsberg, Germany. We discuss the possibility that these same approaches may also be applied to healthy people as an open-ended inquiry into consciousness and mental optimization. It is hoped that these approaches will be beneficial to the medical community, but also equally broaden the reach and context of contemporary art, which is so often marginalized within institutions that are not readily accessible to or in communication with other disciplines. View Full-Text
Keywords: stroke; art; healing; neuroscience; AI; machine learning; therapy; medicine stroke; art; healing; neuroscience; AI; machine learning; therapy; medicine
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Lutyens, M.; Christov-Moore, L. Neglect and the Kaleidoscopic Mind: Psychology and Mental Health in Contemporary Art. Arts 2020, 9, 47.

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