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The Anime Industry, Networks of Participation, and Environments for the Management of Content in Japan

Project Promotion Office, International Center for Japanese Studies, Kyoto 610-1192, Japan
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 10 August 2018 / Accepted: 15 August 2018 / Published: 22 August 2018
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Abstract

Video-sharing sites like YouTube and streaming services like Amazon Prime Video and Netflix, along with unlawful platforms such as Anitube, are environments of consumption enabled by increasing transnational consumption that are pushing for transformations in the Japanese animation industry. Among these platforms, the Kadokawa Dwango Corporation is known to rely on the integration of consumers’ practices and the needs of the animation industry in a changing and challenging era of transnational content flows. In this paper, I focus on the Kadokawa Dwango Corporation, a major player in the contemporary media mix, and its pushing forward of the creation of an environment that integrates two different stances on cultural content: one which represents the industry’s needs regarding cultural content as intellectual property, and another that represents consumers’ practices and which regards content as a common or free resource for enabling participation in digital networks. I argue that rather than the production of content, it is the production of value through the management of fictional worlds and user’s participation in media platforms that lies at the core of the Kadokawa Dwango Corporation’s self-proclaimed ‘ecosystem’. This case represents the transformations in the Japanese content industry to survive the increasing transnationalisation of consumption and production. View Full-Text
Keywords: Kadokawa Dwango; Niconico; Japanese animation market; fan culture; media mix Kadokawa Dwango; Niconico; Japanese animation market; fan culture; media mix
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Hernández, Á.D.H. The Anime Industry, Networks of Participation, and Environments for the Management of Content in Japan. Arts 2018, 7, 42.

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