Next Article in Journal
An Unintended Legacy: The External Policy Responses of the USA and European Union to Conflict Minerals in Africa
Next Article in Special Issue
Retouchée au Féminin: The Gendered Nature of the French Law Mandating Labeling of Digitally Modified Images
Previous Article in Journal
Media and Responsibility for Their Effects: Instrumental vs. Environmental Views
Previous Article in Special Issue
Threats to Women/Women as Threats: Male Supremacy and the Anti-Statist Right
 
 
Article

Bodies in Confinement: Negotiating Queer, Gender Nonconforming, and Transwomen’s Gender and Sexuality behind Bars

Department of Political Science, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA
Laws 2021, 10(2), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/laws10020049
Received: 5 May 2021 / Revised: 14 June 2021 / Accepted: 15 June 2021 / Published: 17 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Body Politic: Women’s Bodies and Political Conflict)
The criminal punishment system plays a critical role in the production of race, gender, and sexuality in the United States. The regulation of marginalized women’s bodies—transwomen, butches, and lesbians—in confinement reproduces cis-heteronormativity. Echoing the paternalistic claims of protection that have inspired “bathroom bills,” gender-segregated prison facilities have notoriously condemned transwomen prisoners to men’s prisons for the “safety” of women’s prisons, constructing cisgender women as “at risk” of sexual assault and transgender women as “risky”, overlooking the reality of transwomen as the most at risk of experiencing sexual violence in prisons. Prisons use legal and medical constructions of gender that pathologize transgender identity in order to legitimize health concerns; for example, the mutilation of the body in an effort to remove unwanted genitalia as evidence to warrant a diagnosis of gender identity disorder, or later gender dysphoria. This construction of transgender identity as a medical condition that warrants treatment forces prisoners to pathologize their gender identity in order to access adequate gender-affirming care. By exploring the writings of queer and trans prisoners, we can glean how heteronormativity structures gender and sexuality behind bars and discover how trans prisoners work to assemble knowledge, support, and resources toward survival. View Full-Text
Keywords: prison; LGBT; queer; transgender; sexual violence; trans healthcare prison; LGBT; queer; transgender; sexual violence; trans healthcare
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Francisco, N.A. Bodies in Confinement: Negotiating Queer, Gender Nonconforming, and Transwomen’s Gender and Sexuality behind Bars. Laws 2021, 10, 49. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws10020049

AMA Style

Francisco NA. Bodies in Confinement: Negotiating Queer, Gender Nonconforming, and Transwomen’s Gender and Sexuality behind Bars. Laws. 2021; 10(2):49. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws10020049

Chicago/Turabian Style

Francisco, Nicole A. 2021. "Bodies in Confinement: Negotiating Queer, Gender Nonconforming, and Transwomen’s Gender and Sexuality behind Bars" Laws 10, no. 2: 49. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws10020049

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop