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Metals 2018, 8(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8010011

Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

1,2
,
1,2
,
1
,
1
,
1,2,*
and
1,2
1
State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 15, North 4th Ring, West Road, Beijing 100190, China
2
School of Engineering Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 6 December 2017 / Revised: 26 December 2017 / Accepted: 27 December 2017 / Published: 29 December 2017
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Abstract

The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS) with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been found to play an important role for this HSSS due to load transfer and strain partitioning between two phases, and a higher strain rate could cause even higher strain partitioning in the softer austenite grains, delaying the deformation instability. Deformation twins are observed in the austenite grains at all strain rates to facilitate the uniform tensile deformation. The B2 phase (FeAl intermetallic compound) is less deformable at higher strain rates, resulting in easier brittle fracture in B2 particles, smaller dimple size and a higher density of phase interfaces in final fracture surfaces. Thus, more energy need be consumed during the final fracture for the experiments conducted at higher strain rates, resulting in better tensile toughness. View Full-Text
Keywords: high specific strength steel; strain rate effect; intermediate strain rates; strain partitioning; deformation twins high specific strength steel; strain rate effect; intermediate strain rates; strain partitioning; deformation twins
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Wang, W.; Ma, Y.; Yang, M.; Jiang, P.; Yuan, F.; Wu, X. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates. Metals 2018, 8, 11.

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